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angry outburst WATCH: Novak Djokovic's epic racket smash at the Australian Open

A ball-kid was asked to clean up the mess Djokovic left behind on the court and spend almost a minute cleaning up pieces of the racket that had sprayed in a variety of directions.

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Novak Djokovic of Serbia smashes his racquet in his Men's Singles Quarterfinals match against Alexander Zverev. (Photo by Matt King/Getty Images)

Novak Djokovic of Serbia smashes his racquet in his Men's Singles Quarterfinals match against Alexander Zverev. (Photo by Matt King/Getty Images)

Novak Djokovic of Serbia smashes his racquet in his Men's Singles Quarterfinals match against Alexander Zverev. (Photo by Matt King/Getty Images)

World No.1 Novak Djokovic lost his cool in spectacular fashion during his Australian Open quarter-final against Alexander Zverev in Melbourne.

Djokovic was struggling mid-way through the third set when he dismantled his racket in stunning fashion, with pieces of the frame spraying all over the court.

A ball-kid was asked to clean up the mess Djokovic left behind on the court and spend almost a minute cleaning up pieces of the racket that had sprayed in a variety of directions.

The outburst seemed to helped Djokovic as he turned in a fine performance to bounce back from being behind in the third set to beat Zverev in four sets, but the incident will do him little to win admirers in a week when he has complained he is not given the respect he is due.

"Nobody in the media can break my spirit, for my connection with my own soul and consciousness is deeper than any news that is written about me and any sort of public criticism," Djokovic said earlier this week.

"I know who I am, what I am, where I am, where I’ve been and where I’m going – I proudly point all that out.

"I am able to be grateful. I am able to put my hands up and apologise when I have made a mistake, but yes, my mistakes are perhaps less forgiven in public in comparison to other players and sports stars.

"Truthfully, I have mostly made peace with it. I cannot say that it doesn’t sometimes get to me – of course an injustice or an unfair portrayal by the media affects me.

"I am a human being, I have emotions and naturally I don’t enjoy it. I would sincerely like to have a good relationship with them, but it seems that this is not always possible.

"I do my best to focus on the positive things and the positive articles."

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