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Beddy for anything Irish gymnast tests 'anti-sex' cardboard beds in Olympic Village

He was curious to see how sturdy the beds really are and filmed himself jumping on his bed to see if it would break under sudden movements.

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Rhys McClenaghan. Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

Rhys McClenaghan. Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

Rhys McClenaghan. Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

Irish gymnast Rhys McClenaghan has debunked the myth of anti-sex beds at the Olympic Games.

The cardboard beds at the Tokyo Olympic Village were installed with the aim of preventing intimacy between athletes.

But McClenaghan, from Newtownards, Co. Down, was curious to see how sturdy the beds really are and filmed himself jumping on his bed to see if it would break under sudden movements.

The 21-year-old took to Twitter to reveal his findings, saying: “In today’s episode of fake news at the Olympic Games, the beds are meant to be anti-sex.

“They’re made out of cardboard, yes but apparently they’re meant to break at any sudden movements,” he said as he bounced on the bed in front of the camera.

“It’s fake. Fake news!”

The video has been retweeted more than 2,000 times and has received almost 15,000 likes.

The official Olympic Games Twitter account responded to McClenaghan’s hilarious video and wrote: “Thanks for debunking the myth. You heard it first from @TeamIreland gymnast @McClenaghanRhys - the sustainable cardboard beds are sturdy! #Tokyo2020”

Christian Klaue, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs Director of the Olympics, also joined in on the fun and shared Rhys’ video, adding his own response.

He said: “Getting a lot of questions right now to @iocmedia about the sustainable cardboard beds of the Olympic Village. @McClenaghanRhys put his to the test. Here we go.”

Thousands of athletes will stay in Tokyo’s Olympic Village during the Games, which will begin on Friday.

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However, despite warnings from organisers that athletes should “avoid unnecessary forms of physical contact,” some 160,000 condoms are expected to be made available to competitors.

The Tokyo 2020 organisers maintain that the condoms are not to be used during the Games and are instead meant to be taken to athletes’ home countries as souvenirs.

In a statement, they said: “The distribution of condoms is not for use at the athlete's village, but to have athletes take them back to their home countries to raise awareness [about HIV/AIDS].”

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