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falling short Proposal B fails to reach 60 per cent majority at GAA Special Congress

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Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael Larry McCarthy with Ard Stiúrthóir of the GAA Tom Ryan, left, and Iar-Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael John Horan, right, during the GAA Special Congress at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael Larry McCarthy with Ard Stiúrthóir of the GAA Tom Ryan, left, and Iar-Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael John Horan, right, during the GAA Special Congress at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael Larry McCarthy with Ard Stiúrthóir of the GAA Tom Ryan, left, and Iar-Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael John Horan, right, during the GAA Special Congress at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

The vote to reform the inter-county season with a new competition structure has failed to pass the 60 per cent majority at a Special Congress in Croke Park.

Proposal B, as it is known, got just 50.6 per cent of the target, a majority but well short of what was required.

GAA president John Horan had proposed the motion and said at the outset that he was not prepared to take it off the table, despite the appeals that followed.

Eight Ulster county delegates spoke against the motion and were joined by contributors from Galway and Mayo in opposition.

The international chairman Niall Erskine, from Donegal, also spoke against, pointing out the "unfairness" of putting the top eight counties in one group and "come what may" three of them won't get by the preliminary stages.

"What other sporting organisation in the world does that," he asked.

Almost every speaker acknowledged the need for change but those against felt there were too many flaws in what was being proposed.

Sligo chairman Sean Carroll and Declan Bohan, Leitrim secretary, said they couldn't look their players in the eye if they were to suffer defeats like what they experienced this summer while Offaly chairman Michael Duignan and former GAA president Sean Kelly both said it would be a dangerous road to oppose the players' voice for change with Kelly saying "that to turn our backs against the voice of the players does not make sense."


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