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all over End of the road for Carl Frampton as he hangs up his gloves after a final world title defeat

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Carl Frampton reacts to a final defeat in Dubai. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

Carl Frampton reacts to a final defeat in Dubai. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

Carl Frampton reacts to a final defeat in Dubai. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

There was to be no glorious swansong for Carl Frampton in Dubai when he failed in his bid to become the first Irish fighter to secure a world title at three different weights.

In his last professional fight, the 34-year-old Belfast man was beaten by the defending WBO super featherweight champion Jamel Herring from the United States.

Frampton’s trainer Jamie Moore threw in the towel at the end of the sixth round after his fighter hit the canvass for the second time in a one-sided contest dominated by the 35-year-old from Cincinnati and as expected, Frampton announced his retirement afterwards.

“I said I would retire if I lost, and that’s exactly what I’ll do. I want to dedicate my life to my family.

“Boxing has been good to me. It’s also been bad to me but the last few years have been the best years of my career.

“I just want to go home to my beautiful wife and kids and dedicate my life to them. That’s it.”

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The referee counts down Carl Frampton after being knocked down during the WBO World Super Featherweight Title Fight in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

The referee counts down Carl Frampton after being knocked down during the WBO World Super Featherweight Title Fight in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

The referee counts down Carl Frampton after being knocked down during the WBO World Super Featherweight Title Fight in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

It was only Frampton’s third career loss, all in world title fights but this was the first time he suffered a TKO.

A former US Marine who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder after a tour of duty in Iraq, this was Herring's twenty-third professional win – and arguably his best performance yet.

Despite suffering a nasty cut on his right eyelid Herring controlled the fight using his seven-inch reach advantage to devastating effect.

Boxing from the southpaw stance he never allowed Frampton to close the distance and dominated the opening three rounds.

Frampton had more success in the fourth stanza when he finally started to land with his left hook and with Herring’s vision almost certainly impaired due to blood from the cut seeping into his eye, he looked vulnerable for the first time.

Herring’s corner did their best to stem the blood flow at the end of the round and perhaps anticipating the cut could cause him problem later in the fight, he started to look to land the knockout punch to end the fight.

He caught Frampton with a cracking right which stunned the Belfast fighter and though he hit the canvas there was no lasting damage done but it still went down as a 10-8 round for the champion.

Worst was the follow with 90 seconds left in the sixth round, however.

This time Frampton was clearly hurt after Herring corrected with a clean left upper cut. Bravely Frampton struggled to rise and beat the count.

The Italian referee Giustino Di Giovanni allowed the fight to continue though it was obvious that Frampton was in trouble.

Not surprisingly Herring went on the offensive. Frampton could offer little resistance and just as the referee looked set to bring the fight to an end the challenger’s trainer Jamie Moore threw in the towel to bring the curtain down on the contest.

Frampton's dream was over. Despite this anti climatic end, he will be remembered as one of Ireland’s most successful professional fighters.

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Jamel Herring of the USA celebrates victory as Carl Frampton accepts a final career defeat. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

Jamel Herring of the USA celebrates victory as Carl Frampton accepts a final career defeat. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

Jamel Herring of the USA celebrates victory as Carl Frampton accepts a final career defeat. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

Recruited from the amateur ranks by former world champion Barry McGuigan and trained by his son Shane, he initially held European and Commonwealth super-bantamweight titles between 2011 and 2014.

He challenged for his first world title on September 6, 2014 defeating Spain’s Kiko Martinez to secure the IBF super bantamweight title at a specially constructed outdoor arena at the Titantic Quarter in Belfast.

Two years later he unified the division by taking Scott Quigg’s WBA super-bantamweight title winning on a split decision in front of a sell-out crowd in Manchester.

Frampton moved up a weight class to fight undefeated Mexican Leo Santa Cruz for the WBA featherweight title at the Barclays Centre in New York in July 2016.

In what was his finest ever performance Frampton secured the verdict via a points’ decision to become Northern Ireland’s first ever two-division world champion.

But Frampton surrendered the belt in a rematch against Cruz in early 2017 in Las Vegas.

Subsequently Frampton and McGuignan split with their case finally settled in the Belfast High Court last year.

The fighter linked up with a new trainer Jamie Moore but was beaten by Josh Warrington when he challenged for the IBF featherweight title against Josh Warrington in December 2018.

But he achieved all his ambitions including his dream to fight at Windsor Park in Belfast and can now enjoy his retirement with his wife Christine and family.

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