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Crime Time Kin's Sam Keeley and Yasmin Seky deny claims that show 'glamourises' gangland violence

Kin has been criticised for glamourising gangland violence and crime by broadcaster Joe Duffy, Dublin GAA star Philly McMahon, and former Mayor of Dublin Christy Burke.

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Sam Keeley stars as Eric Kinsella in RTÉ’s crime drama 'Kin'

Sam Keeley stars as Eric Kinsella in RTÉ’s crime drama 'Kin'

Sam Keeley stars as Eric Kinsella in RTÉ’s crime drama 'Kin'

Kin stars Yasmin Seky and Sam Keeley have defended the show against claims that it glamourises gangland violence.

The eight-part drama series, which follows the fictional Kinsella crime gang in Dublin, has been a huge ratings success for RTÉ since it first aired earlier this month.

However, Kin has been criticised for glamourising gangland violence and crime by voices like broadcaster Joe Duffy, Dublin GAA star Philly McMahon, and former Mayor of Dublin Christy Burke.

But Yasmin Seky, who plays Nikita Murphy in the series, insists that there’s more to Kin “than just gangsters.”

Speaking to the Irish Mirror, she said: “I don’t think it takes a drama for people to look at the glamorous side of that sort of lifestyle.

“There are just people who don’t like watching things about crime and it’s a crime drama, they’re entitled to their opinion. There’s more to the show than just gangsters.

“As the story goes on and even in the next episode, people are really going to come back from it and realise the characters are mothers, brothers.

“They’re not only drug dealers and drug dealers' wives and girlfriends, there are kind of consequences to the actions.”

Yasmin’s co-star Sam Keeley, who plays Eric ‘Viking’ Kinsella, said that the violence shown on screen is integral to the story of the fictitious Kinsella clan.

“We make these shows and create art for people to judge and to scrutinise if that’s how they feel,” he said.

“I think it would be remiss of us as artists if we told these stories in a censored sort of way — where we didn’t show drug use and shootings and scraps in the street.

“Unfortunately, because these are real stories that have affected people’s lives, these are integral parts of those stories.

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“I think people should go and watch the show, because to me there is nothing glamorous about losing your kids, there is nothing glamorous about drug use, there is nothing glamorous about fighting in the street — but unfortunately these things are part of the stories of the characters and we have to do that justice.”

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