| 9.7°C Dublin

country lover Garth Brooks says he plans to holiday in Ireland after gigs with the 'love of his life' Trisha

"You're here with the love of your life in one of the most romantic places on the planet," he says

Close

Garth and Trisha

Garth and Trisha

Garth and Trisha

Garth Brooks reveals that he's hoping to holiday in Ireland with Trisha Yearwood in the aftermath of his September 2022 Croke Park gigs.

"We'll see," Garth tells the Sunday World.

"You're here with the love of your life in one of the most romantic places on the planet.

"And Miss Yearwood loves this place as much as I do, and the food is so good, so I don't know why we wouldn't stay here. It would be great.

"My hope is that somebody sees us and goes, 'Oh my God, aren't you gone yet!'" he laughs.

The country king also told how his daughter, Allie, studied in Ireland for three months in recent years.

Close

Allie Colleen Brooks and her father Garth (Photo by Rick Diamond/Getty Images)

Allie Colleen Brooks and her father Garth (Photo by Rick Diamond/Getty Images)

Allie Colleen Brooks and her father Garth (Photo by Rick Diamond/Getty Images)

Garth admits he missed her like hell. "She was here as part of her school programme. It was the longest three months for me, but she had the time of her life. Everyone was so sweet to her."

Allie posted on social media how she was singing in pubs. "Yeah, that girl, she's got more balls or more guts, whatever, than I ever had," he says. "I never had that, ever. She's never met a stranger. She is her grandmother. She is my mom."

In a one-on-one interview with the Sunday World in a corporate suite at the GAA headquarters after the press conference, Garth glances out on to the turf of Croker where he will play five nights next September to 400,000 fans.

His yearning and excitement at the prospect of becoming the ‘King of Croker’ in 2022 is written all over his emotional face.

“We got to play there [in 1997] when half of it was under construction and the old stand was still over there,” he gestures. “To get to play it in full now would be crazy.”

Close

Country music star Garth Brooks on the roof of Croke Park in Dublin (Niall Carson/PA)

Country music star Garth Brooks on the roof of Croke Park in Dublin (Niall Carson/PA)

Country music star Garth Brooks on the roof of Croke Park in Dublin (Niall Carson/PA)

Sunday World Newsletter

Sign up for the latest news and updates

This field is required This field is required

Since his five sold out shows in 2014 were cancelled amid a licensing debacle, Garth has gone on to sell over 6.3 million tickets on an arena tour with his wife, Trisha Yearwood — making it the biggest North American tour in history.

In 2019, his stadium tour set attendance records at every venue in the States and was the best-selling country music tour that year.

Despite all of that, Brooks says that performing at Croke Park is the ultimate prize for him. He’d been offered other Irish stadiums around the country, but has stuck to his guns to play the iconic GAA venue, and his ticket prices are the same as they were in 2014.

It’s not about the money — Brooks is worth more than €300 million, according to insiders — he just wants to experience the thrill again of performing to an Irish crowd in the magnificent stadium.

Close

Country music star Garth Brooks on the roof of Croke Park.  Niall Carson/PA Wire

Country music star Garth Brooks on the roof of Croke Park. Niall Carson/PA Wire

Country music star Garth Brooks on the roof of Croke Park. Niall Carson/PA Wire

“Money was never the reason I got up on stage,” Garth tells me. “It wasn’t why you got into it. You got into it for the girls. It was never about money and it’s still not. If you make decisions based on the money, then I don’t think it’s going to be one-tenth as fun. Any time money comes into anything that’s sweet and pure it’s gonna go bad.”

He played to one million people in New York’s Central Park in 1997, but Garth says his three shows at the old Croke Park that year are his favourite of all time, and he has been dreaming about reliving them.

So Croke Park is personal for him? “Well, Ireland is,” he says. “It just is. And Ireland may not want to be - ‘hey, we never asked to be personal’ — but I can’t help it. I fell in love with this place at The Point, and I’ve been in love with this place ever since. It means the world to me to get this opportunity to get to play Croke Park again.”

Close

Garth Brooks will play two concerts at Croke Park in Dublin next September (PA)

Garth Brooks will play two concerts at Croke Park in Dublin next September (PA)

Garth Brooks will play two concerts at Croke Park in Dublin next September (PA)

Given the incredible shows he’s done in America, you’d imagine the novelty of Croke Park would have worn off by now. Brooks insists that it hasn’t.

“This is tough, because anything you say people will say, ‘oh, he’s just saying that.’ You can do all the other gigs in the world, but this one [Croker] is the one that you actually have a shot at being better than you ever could be by yourself.

“These people [Irish fans] make the difference between a great show and a show for all time.”

Brooks plans to film the Croke Park concerts, but he hasn’t yet decided if it will be shown in cinemas or on a streaming service such as Netflix. “There are so many places to go now, but people need to see the joy that this place creates…and the love, because I think the world would be better off if we were all more like the people here.

“Like I said, it’s that thing when you come here, there’s something here that relaxes you, there’s just a lot of love here. I saw it in the press conference.

“I’ve never seen a press conference like that, there was a lot of love in there. I feel blessed.”

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices


Privacy