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Back in black... and white AC/DC’s new video magically brings band together while apart

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Legendary AC/DC rock 2021 with new video

Legendary AC/DC rock 2021 with new video

Legendary AC/DC rock 2021 with new video

AFTER closing out 2020 by topping the charts in 18 countries with their worldwide number one album, Power Up, AC/DC have blasted back into 2021 with a new video for Realize.

The black and white-hued video showcases Angus, Brian, Cliff, Phil and Stevie doing what they do best: rocking out “together”.

However, confronted with the challenge of having the band in five different locations, the co-directors approached the video as a puzzle and pieced each individual performance together to create a cohesive visual that shows AC/DC like never before.

AC/DC are one of the most influential rock bands in history with more than 200 million albums sold worldwide.

Their double-diamond Back in Black stands out as the bestselling album by any band ever and third bestselling album by any artist with global sales of 50 million and counting.

It has also been a triumphant return for Brian Johnson after the singer recovered his hearing in what has been reported as “a medical miracle”.

In 2016, when AC/DC announced they were postponing dates on their Rock or Bust tour, fans learned for the first time that their frontman was suffering from hearing loss.

“It was pretty serious,” Brian said. “I couldn’t hear the tone of the guitars at all. It was a horrible kind of deafness.”

Before throwing in the towel and handing over the mic to Axl Rose of Guns N Roses who completed the tour, Johnson said he was able to get through many Rock or Bust performances purely using “muscle memory and mouth shapes”.

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But as the deafness got progressively worse, Brian realised that he couldn’t battle through it any longer. “I was starting to really feel bad about the performances in front of the boys, in front of the audience,” he says. “It was crippling. There’s nothing worse than standing there and not being sure.”

At risk of permanent hearing loss, Johnson stepped away from the stage. In March 2016, the band announced that Axl Rose would fill in on vocals for the postponed performances.

For the first time in 36 years, Brian Johnson wasn’t fronting AC/DC, and he admits that it was a traumatic situation to have to comes to terms with. Eventually, he enlisted a medical specialist and began an experimental treatment designed to restore his hearing.

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“The first time he came down he brought this thing that looked like a car battery,” Johnson revealed. “I went, ‘What in the hell is that?’ He said, ‘We’re going to miniaturise it.’ It took two and a half years. He came down once a month. We’d sit there and it was boring as sh*t with all these wires and computer screens and noises. But it was well worth it.”

The exact science behind the treatment is something of a mystery, with Johnson willing to divulge only minimal information: “The only thing I can tell you is that it uses the bone structure in the skull as a receiver. That’s as much as I can tell you.”

Johnson kept his bandmates up to date with his progress and, when Angus Young decided to reassemble the group for a new album, the singer was up to the task.

“We’d get updated on how he was going with it and everything,” Young noted. “It was very good. I know how much a part of his life this is for Brian. It’s the same as the rest of us.”

Recorded in late 2018 and early 2019, AC/DC’s new album, Power Up, is the twelfth to feature Johnson on vocals.

The band had hoped to tour the release in 2020, before coronavirus brought the music industry to a halt. Still, the legendary rockers were able to get in one big concert rehearsal before the pandemic struck.

“It was with the boys in full battlefield conditions and it was smashing, brilliant,” Johnson admitted. “I felt like I was a kid again.”

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