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And the Osc-her goes to... Two women in line for Best Director at tonight's 93rd Academy Awards awards... but will one win?

Here we toast just some of the Oscars' record-breaking women.

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Kathryn Bigelow with her Oscars for Best Director and Best Film.

Kathryn Bigelow with her Oscars for Best Director and Best Film.

But bookies’ favourite Chloé Zhao

But bookies’ favourite Chloé Zhao

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Kathryn Bigelow with her Oscars for Best Director and Best Film.

For the first time in history, two women are among those battling it out for Best Director at the 93rd Academy Awards tonight.

But bookies' favourite Chloé Zhao, who won the Golden Globe for Nomadland, and Promising Young Woman director Emerald Fennell aren't the first to blaze a trail on Hollywood's biggest stage.

With just 32 per cent of voters female, the notoriously male-dominated Academy Awards has come under renewed pressure in recent years to honour more of the talented women making movies today.

In 2012, Best Actress Frances McDormand memorably showcased the extent of the problem when she urged the year's few female nominees to stand up during her acceptance speech.

As more prepare to join her in the history books tonight, here we toast just some of the Oscars' record-breaking women.

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Katharine Hepburn wasn’t impressed by her Oscar wins.

Katharine Hepburn wasn’t impressed by her Oscar wins.

Katharine Hepburn wasn’t impressed by her Oscar wins.

Katharine Hepburn

Eighteen years after her death, Katharine Hepburn still holds the record for the most Oscar wins by any actor.

But you won't find any snaps of the Hollywood legend showing off any of her four Best Actress baldies on Google.

Although she didn't pull a Brando by rejecting the gongs, she didn't turn up to accept them either, famously telling: "Prizes are nothing. My prize is my work."

With a legacy including Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967) and On Golden Pond (1981), it's hard to disagree.

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Meryl Streep at the 1983 Academy Awards.

Meryl Streep at the 1983 Academy Awards.

Meryl Streep at the 1983 Academy Awards.

Meryl Streep

Nipping at Hepburn's heels with three Academy Awards is Meryl Streep.

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The grand dame of Hollywood took home hardware for Kramer vs. Kramer (1979), Sophie's Choice (1982) and The Iron Lady (2011).

However, with a record 21 nods for acting spanning from 1978's The Deer Hunter to 2017's The Post, she's the biggest loser in Oscars history too.

Not to worry, as her mantelpiece is also groaning under the unrivalled weight of eight Golden Globes from 32 nominations over the course of her glittering career.

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Glenn Close is still awaiting her first Oscar.

Glenn Close is still awaiting her first Oscar.

Glenn Close is still awaiting her first Oscar.

Glenn Close

Close by name, close by nature for Glenn, who after eight nominations over four decades has yet to hear her name called out on the night.

The star of stage and screen has no shortage of Tonys, Emmys, Golden Globes and SAG awards to polish but controversially has still not been honoured by the Academy.

The 74 year-old is up for Best Supporting Actress for Hillbilly Elegy at tonight's awards.

If she loses out again, to favourite Youn Yuh-jung, at least she'll be in good company, tying with the late Peter O'Toole for the most nods without a win.

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Whoopi Goldberg has both won and presented the Oscars.

Whoopi Goldberg has both won and presented the Oscars.

Whoopi Goldberg has both won and presented the Oscars.

Whoopi Goldberg

Long before Ellen DeGeneres' internet-breaking selfie, Whoopi Goldberg broke records of another kind when she became the first woman to present the Academy Awards alone. The comedian and actress knocked it out of the park in 1994 and again in 1996, 1999 and 2002, when she unforgettably made her entrance on a Moulin Rouge-inspired swing. Other female members of the exclusive club include Anne Hathaway (2011) and Jane Fonda (1986), who both co-hosted.

Tonight's ceremony is expected to be host-free for the third year in a row after Kevin Hart's Tweetgate in 2019.

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Tatum O’Neal was just 10 when she triumphed.

Tatum O’Neal was just 10 when she triumphed.

Tatum O’Neal was just 10 when she triumphed.

Tatum O'Neal

Saoirse Ronan famously bagged her first Oscar nomination for Atonement at just 13 in 2007. But the youngest ever person to triumph in any category at the starry ceremony was Tatum O'Neal in 1974.

The then ten year-old scooped Best Supporting Actress for her role in Paper Moon alongside her famous dad Ryan O'Neal.

And the orchestra certainly didn't have to play her off the stage as the young star kept her acceptance speech short and sweet, beaming: "All I really want to thank is my director Peter Bogdanovich and my father."

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Jessica Tandy was 80 when she won.

Jessica Tandy was 80 when she won.

Jessica Tandy was 80 when she won.

Jessica Tandy

No good roles for women over 50 in Hollywood? Beloved British star Jessica Tandy was 80 when she earned Best Actress for Driving Miss Daisy opposite Morgan Freeman in 1990.

She remains the oldest actress ever to win an Oscar, although that record could be shattered tonight if 88 year-old Ellen Burstyn lifts Best Supporting Actress for Pieces of a Woman.

Tandy - who died in 1994 - shared her big moment with My Left Foot stars Daniel Day-Lewis, who won Best Actor, and Brenda Fricker, who won Best Supporting Actress, the same year.

She even got another night out in 1992 when was nominated for Fried Green Tomatoes.

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Hattie McDaniel was the first black woman to win in 1940.

Hattie McDaniel was the first black woman to win in 1940.

Hattie McDaniel was the first black woman to win in 1940.

Hattie McDaniel

Hollywood history was made when Hattie McDaniel was named Best Supporting Actress for her turn as Mammy in Gone With The Wind in 1940. But the first black Oscar winner's moment of glory was marred by the fact that she was forced to sit at the back of auditorium - away from her white co-stars - due to the racial segregation of the day.

It would be another 62 years before Halle Berry became the first woman of colour to win in a lead role, with the Monster's Ball star declaring the moment "so much bigger" than her.

Kathryn Bigelow

US filmmaker Kathryn Bigelow was famously the first woman to scoop Best Director for The Hurt Locker in 2010. Even sweeter was the fact that she beat her ex-husband James Cameron - who was also up for the gong for box office juggernaut Avatar - with the low-budget Iraq War drama.

Shamefully, only seven women, including this year's two nominees - have ever been nominated in the category in the Academy's near 100-year history.


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