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Back in town Thin Lizzy's first manager says new documentary 'almost made him forget Phil Lynott was dead'


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Legendary rocker Phil Lynott

Legendary rocker Phil Lynott

Legendary rocker Phil Lynott

Thin Lizzy's first manager has revealed how the new Phil Lynott documentary Songs For While I'm Away almost brought the legendary 70s rocker back to life for him.

While Irish fans have yet to see the film - as Level Five lockdown closed cinemas here from October 21 just days before its release - Terry O'Neill insists it will be worth the wait.

Speaking to the Sunday World from his home in Liverpool, Dubliner Terry said: "I think everyone's going to love it.

"Phil's charisma is just oozing off the screen. You almost forgot he was dead!"

Terry, who became Thin Lizzy's first manager aged just 18, is in the documentary.

He was there for the band's first gig at Cloghran School Hall in Dublin on February 13, 1970 where they were joint headliners with another Dublin band Purple Pussycat.

Now aged 69, Terry was contacted by the filmmakers who came to Liverpool to meet him and he later travelled to London for filming.

"I'm in it for a short bit. I'm in it for three or four minutes. I'm not a movie star," he chuckles.

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Terry O'Neill with Kilkenny promoter Eamon Langton Kilkenny  and Phil Lynott.

Terry O'Neill with Kilkenny promoter Eamon Langton Kilkenny and Phil Lynott.

Terry O'Neill with Kilkenny promoter Eamon Langton Kilkenny and Phil Lynott.

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Thin Lizzy with Phil Lynott left

Thin Lizzy with Phil Lynott left

Thin Lizzy

Thin Lizzy

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Thin Lizzy with Phil Lynott left

Having seen other documentaries on Phil and Thin Lizzy through the years, Terry firmly believes this one is the best.

Admitting that he's "completely biased", Terry says he gives the film 10 out of 10.

"I almost can't believe how good it is," Terry adds.

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"It doesn't cover up anything, everything is out in the open. It's a great cinema experience."

And he heaped praise on Emmy Award-winning director Emer Reynolds' cinematography and the use of music throughout the movie.

"I don't know how she did it, everything is just so fresh," he explained.

Although Liverpool is at a 'very high' Covid-19 alert level, cinemas are still open, unlike Ireland, although social distancing is enforced and patrons must wear masks.

Watching the documentary stirred a mix of emotions for Terry as he sat in Liverpool's Everyman Cinema last Wednesday night.

"There were bits where you'd roar laughing and towards the end, I just cried my eyes out," he revealed.

"I had my mask on so no one could see."

Terry added the film isn't just for die-hard Lizzy fans.

"If you've any kind of any interest in Thin Lizzy, in Phil, in Ireland, you'll like it", he said.

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