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'Fond memories' The Cranberries pay tribute to Dolores O'Riordan on her third anniversary

She is always in our thoughts and our hearts.”

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Dolores O'Riordan on stage with The Cranberries in the Point Depot, in 1995 (Part of the Independent Newspapers Ireland/NLI Collection).

Dolores O'Riordan on stage with The Cranberries in the Point Depot, in 1995 (Part of the Independent Newspapers Ireland/NLI Collection).

Dolores O'Riordan on stage with The Cranberries in the Point Depot, in 1995 (Part of the Independent Newspapers Ireland/NLI Collection).

Members of the Irish rock band The Cranberries have paid tribute to their former bandmate Dolores O'Riordan, who passed away three years ago today.

Speaking on Twitter, guitarist Noel Hogan, bassist Mike Hogan, and drummer Fergal Lawler posted about O'Riordan following the anniversary of her death.

“It’s hard to believe that three years have gone by since Dolores passed on,” they said. “She is always in our thoughts and our hearts.”

“So many years of fond memories. Wherever you are D, we hope you’re bringing joy with your unique voice.”

O'Riordan passed away as a result of accidental drowning in a bath following sedation by alcohol intoxication, but she's most remembered for her rich contribution to music.

The Cranberries actually had a different lead vocalist originally, Niall Quinn. But one year later in 1990, O'Riordan joined.

Born in Limerick, O’Riordan was the youngest of nine children. When she first joined the Cranberries, she was still in secondary school.

The band enjoyed great success, with hits like "Dreams", "Linger", and "Zombie" - which discussed the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

They had eight top 20 singles, and were nominated for a Grammy for their final album "In The End". The album was released after O'Riordan's death, and included some of her last recordings.

The band also decided to split following the release of the album. Noel Hogan said at the time: "We don't want to continue without Dolores, so we're just going to leave after this".

But their impact on the Irish music scene is unlikely to be forgotten.

Their song "Zombie", despite being released in 1994, was actually the first Irish song to reach one billion views on YouTube. And as of 2019, the band have sold almost 50 million albums worldwide.

Following her death, many fans revisited their music, with three of their songs ranking in the top 10 of the iTunes songs chart.

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