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'Vulnerable' RTE's Lottie Ryan opens up about being separated from newborn son in hospital

The RTÉ 2fm presenter and her husband Fabio Aprile welcomed their son Wolf into the world in July after he arrived two months before his due date.

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Lottie Ryan. Photo: Mark Condren

Lottie Ryan. Photo: Mark Condren

Lottie Ryan. Photo: Mark Condren

Lottie Ryan has admitted that she felt “vulnerable” when her son Wolf had to remain in NICU after he was born.

The RTÉ 2fm presenter and her husband Fabio Aprile welcomed their son Wolf into the world in July after he arrived two months before his due date.

Wolf’s premature birth was pretty scary for Lottie, but the most difficult part was being separated from her baby boy when she was discharged and he had to remain in intensive care in the Rotunda Hospital.

“It was really difficult. That was not nice. Nobody wants to leave the maternity hospital without their baby,” she told RSVP Magazine.

“Thankfully, I have a family who rallied around me and they were able to drive me in and out every day. That was the way we had to do it.”

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Lottie Ryan with her son Wolf
Photo Lottie Ryan/Instagram

Lottie Ryan with her son Wolf Photo Lottie Ryan/Instagram

Lottie Ryan with her son Wolf Photo Lottie Ryan/Instagram

The 36-year-old revealed that and Fabio were not allowed to visit Wolf in hospital together due to Covid restrictions.

“The first time we managed to get a family photo together was the day he was discharged from hospital,” she explained.

“Up until then the three of us were never together at the same time. But, saying that, these things have to be done to keep the babies safe.

“Looking back, it is all a bit of a blur but the staff, the doctors and nurses, couldn't have been more incredible.

“You are so vulnerable when something like that happens and you have to rely on those people so much. They become your crutch. I couldn’t have gotten through it without the team at The Rotunda.”

Lottie said that her recovery over the past six months has been tedious and frustrating but she is trying to think positively about it.

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“I have to be grateful and I keep reminding myself what my body has given me. It sounds so cheesy but creating human life is a big bloody deal.

“When I am getting frustrated with myself, I have to remember what my body has given me.

“It is a slow process to get your strength back and to get your hormones back on track. It is a big rigmarole but I am nearly there and I am getting back to myself,” she added.

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