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Baby Joy Model Hannah Devane welcomes baby girl after 'rough delivery'

The Britain and Ireland's Next Top Model finalist welcomed her first child with husband Nemanja Vukanic earlier this month after a lengthy IVF journey and a “rough delivery.”

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Baby Maya Rose (Hannah Devane/Instagram)

Baby Maya Rose (Hannah Devane/Instagram)

Baby Maya Rose (Hannah Devane/Instagram)

Irish model Hannah Devane has shared the first photo of her “beautiful” newborn daughter in a sweet Instagram post.

The Britain and Ireland's Next Top Model finalist welcomed her first child with husband Nemanja Vukanic earlier this month after a lengthy IVF journey and a “rough delivery.”

Taking to Instagram on Monday, Hannah shared a photo of adorable baby Maya Rose as she snoozed in front of a sign that said “Today I am two weeks old.”

She said: “Maya Rose Vukanić. Our beautiful girl was born on 4/4/22 after a rough delivery we both had some recovering to do but we are home and she has stolen our hearts. #ivfjourney #babygirl #ourgirlishere”

Hannah, who was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2016 after years of pain, has previously opened up about how her condition nearly prevented her from getting pregnant.

“There are so many misconceptions out there. Women fear about their fertility.” she told Image.

“I am 36 weeks pregnant. I consider it a miracle because I didn’t know if I could ever get pregnant. I went through IVF twice to get to this point but so many people with endometriosis naturally conceive.”

The Dubliner is passionate about helping others and raising awareness for endometriosis and women’s health.

“People need to listen to women, we need early education to learn what’s normal but also what’s not normal when it comes to female health, we need to break the taboo so that more people can open up, and there has to be better training for doctors and surgeons to allow for earlier diagnosis and therefore better quality of life for those who suffer from it,” she said.

“Endometriosis is a progressive disease; it grows every month. It can take nine years to get a diagnosis and a lot of damage is done in that time. I don’t want women to suffer in silence. I hope my story can reach someone else and help them not to feel alone.

“I would have loved to have support when I was going through it. Everyone focuses on the physical symptoms, but not being taken seriously, not being listened to, having fear about the future, these have such a mental and emotional toll.”

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