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Hor-rob-le Love/Hate actor Robert Sheehan says fame can be 'dehumanising'

The former Love/Hate actor opened up about the highs and lows of fame on the latest episode of Blindboy’s podcast.

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Robert Sheehan. Photo: Christian Tierney

Robert Sheehan. Photo: Christian Tierney

Robert Sheehan. Photo: Christian Tierney

Robert Sheehan has said that fame can sometimes be “dehumanising” for him.

The former Love/Hate actor opened up about the highs and lows of fame on the latest episode of Blindboy’s podcast.

Robert admitted that he sometimes gets overwhelmed by fans approaching him on the streets but said that this mostly only happens in his hometown of Portlaoise.

“People... no, they don’t leave me alone,” he told Blindboy, whose real name is David Chambers, during the live podcast.

“They’re resoundingly lovely and charming and often chronically apologetic for having come over to the dinner table or whatever it is.

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Blindboy with Robert Sheehan

Blindboy with Robert Sheehan

Blindboy with Robert Sheehan

“There’s a slight weariness that kicks in after the 10th photograph of the day. But that’s kind of only Portlaoise to be honest, and I suppose it’s because I’m from there so it’s like, ‘Oh there he is!’

“I must preface all this by saying that there’s an aspect of [fame] that I really genuinely love. I sat down and meditated on it a few years ago, especially after the second series of The Umbrella Academy.

“I was like, ‘Yeah, this is great’ but it’s also strange because I’m being treated very differently by people now. If you’re being treated differently than normal, it feels dehumanising straight away.

“But I sat down and thought about it and relaxed and thought, if I accept this wholeheartedly and embrace this, people are incredibly trusting and really forthcoming and as a creative person writing and stuff, you can get very interesting things out of people who want to share things with you.”

The actor said that the reception he receives in the UK is much more “startling” as people pay little attention to one another in public.

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“Up until recently, when I wasn’t working, I’d go back to London and that would be my base, where people were profoundly indifferent to one another in public spaces. I think Irish people find that quite startling and quite troubling. I certainly did.

“The indifference is so pointed over there that it hurts after a while. It wears on me spiritually,” he added.

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