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'Certain affinity' Louise McSharry says she's having a 'visceral response' to Adele’s weight loss

I have been struggling to even look at Adele and it is not that I feel she owes me anything or that she should have a certain type of body"

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Adele will host Saturday Night Live (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

Adele will host Saturday Night Live (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

Adele will host Saturday Night Live (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

2FM DJ Louise McSharry has revealed that she is having a "visceral response" to Adele’s dramatic seven stone weight loss.

The popular broadcaster admitted that she had been struggling to process the popstar's change in body shape, after she made her first public appearance on Saturday Night Live this weekend.

On the show Adele acknowledged her new slim figure before hosting the show, even throwing in a tantalising medley of her biggest hits.

But the radio DJ, who now has two sons with her husband Gordon Spierin, spoke at her disappointment at Adele’s new trim figure, as she had been a role model, for plus sized women around the world.

“I feel like I have to say this, personally I am having a really visceral response to Adele’s change of body,” she told listeners to her Sunday morning show.

“I was trying to make sense of it this morning and I tweeted about it and that helped.

“I have loved Adele, since, I remember being sent a bootleg of her singing Home Town Glory, before it was even released.

“She was on the BBC’s introducing list for that year. She was with 20 other people that the BBC were saying were going to be massive for that year.

“And when I saw her and I realised that she had a body like mine, I loved her even more.

“Because at that time, there were almost no people in the public eye who had bodies like mine, none.

“I feel a certain affinity when I see woman like me because there just aren’t that many of us.”

Louise admitted that she was conflicted when it came to speaking about her idol Adele, given the media’s obsession with body shapes.

But she said she felt she had to address the issue as she believed that other women like her must be feeling the same thing.

“The media is obsessed with people’s bodies which is why I didn’t want to talk about it until now, because I don’t want to feed into that culture,” she said.

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Louise McSharry

Louise McSharry

Louise McSharry

“But what I do want to say is, because, I for so long had this connection to her, I felt... If Adele is beautiful and fabulous and cool and funny and everyone loves her, then maybe I am OK.

“And 12 years ago, I was not where I am now in terms with the way I feel about myself and society was not where it is about the discourse of bodies.

“I have been struggling to even look at Adele and it is not that I feel she owes me anything or that she should have a certain type of body.

“I feel passionately that people should be able to do whatever they want with their bodies...

“I have found it hard, it is about me, she was one of us and it feels a little bit like a loss.

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Adele

Adele

Adele

“And it is not about her at all, it is about how women like us are represented in the media. I just wanted to mention it because I know there will be others who feel this way.

“Good for Adele, you do you babes, you do whatever you want with your body...I just don’t think there should ever be an article about how thin or how fat someone is.”

Sunday World


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