| 3.7°C Dublin

Dream role Liam Neeson wishes a Michael Collins sequel was made

The actor (68), who played the Irish rebel leader in Neil Jordan's original 1996 film, said he was "too old" now but would have relished starring in a second film about the peace talks in 1921.

Close

Neeson as Collins

Neeson as Collins

Neeson as Collins

Liam Neeson has revealed he would have loved to have starred in a sequel to the movie Michael Collins.

The actor (68), who played the Irish rebel leader in Neil Jordan's original 1996 film, said he was "too old" now but would have relished starring in a second film about the peace talks in 1921.

"I would have loved to have seen that process of him sitting down with Churchill. He became very, very good friends with the Minister of Defence," the Taken star said.

"The story of Collins is that, when he goes to negotiate with the creme de la creme of the British cabinet at that time. He was a soldier and he begged not to be sent over there.

"Those negotiations went on for weeks and weeks and weeks.

"There were these extraordinary British politicians and, across the table, was Michael Collins and some of his associates, and his knees were shaking.

"I wish we could do it. I'm too old for it now but I would have loved to have done a sequel to Michael Collins about the weeks of negotiation in London with the British cabinet to try to get an Irish Republic.

"All he could get was a free state, which eventually lead to Collins' death.

"He was one of the Founding Fathers of the modern Irish Republic and he's still very, very highly controversial.

"Many people would say that he's the Founding Father of modern terrorism. That is debatable.

Close

Liam Neeson

Liam Neeson

REUTERS

Liam Neeson

"When the fight against the British was going on to form the state of Israel, and they were fighting for their independence for the free state of Israel, they used code words about Michael Collins, out of respect for him."

The actor told Collider website he believed that when Collins met the British Cabinet they sat around a large table which was still in use at Downing Street.

"Collins asked if he could use the restroom, so he was told where it was. He was nervous, so he wanted to go and collect his thoughts.

"Apparently, he was washing his hands and in came Winston Churchill. He said to Collins, 'Mr. Collins, you know there's a price on your head of five thousand pounds?'

"'Yes, indeed sir, I know,' Collins said. Churchill replied, 'When I was your age, there was a price of ten thousand pounds on my head.' And then, Collins replied to him, 'Sir, we know you're twice the man I am.'

"I love that story. I wish we could film a sequel."

Neeson was promoting his latest thriller, Honest Thief, in which he plays a former bank robber trying to keep on the straight and narrow after falling in love.

Herald


Privacy