| 12.6°C Dublin

'no craic' Jason Byrne says he feared therapy would take away his 'superpower of being funny'

I thought when I came out [of therapy] I wouldn't be any craic anymore," Jason has said.

Close

Denise van Outen and Jason Byrne and Glenda Gilson

Denise van Outen and Jason Byrne and Glenda Gilson

Denise van Outen and Jason Byrne and Glenda Gilson

Comedian Jason Byrne has revealed he was afraid that going to therapy would take away his "superpower of being funny."

The Dubliner has created the Mind Your Loaf podcast, which features a range of wellbeing experts and aims to introduce people to professional advice without the extortionate prices and long waiting lists.

Speaking on Alive and Kicking on Newstalk with Clare McKenna, Jason opened up about attending therapy during the pandemic and explained why he felt compelled to start his podcast.

“The podcast is a wellbeing approach to life,” he said.

“I was thinking of trying to go back to university to go and study psychotherapy or something like that before the pandemic because my gigging was getting so intense and I was doing so much gigging.

“Because I'm nearly 50 my brain was going, ‘Fancy slowing down a bit now?’

Close

Comedian Jason Byrne and TV presenter Sinead Quinlan launch MIND YOUR LOAF

Comedian Jason Byrne and TV presenter Sinead Quinlan launch MIND YOUR LOAF

Comedian Jason Byrne and TV presenter Sinead Quinlan launch MIND YOUR LOAF

“Then the pandemic hits and all my gigs go and I have no income for a year and I'm starting to think if I'm struggling to pay for therapy imagine people who can't afford to pay for it at all.”

The funnyman also spoke about having doubts before going to therapy but added that it was the right thing to do because he was so burnt out from constant gigging.

“I was just wrecked, I needed to look after myself a bit more, with exercise and meditation and diet so I put the foot on the brake and look after myself a bit more,” he explained.

“I thought when I came out [of therapy] I wouldn't be any craic anymore, I thought that it would take away my superpower of being funny.

Sunday World Newsletter

Sign up for the latest news and updates

This field is required This field is required

“Like Superman with kryptonite, I thought that's what therapy would be.”

Jason found that therapy really helped him to stay sane and manage his problems, but added that being on stage was a huge relief to him too.

“Instead of going out and punching a wall or something, I would just go out and release it all on stage, and that felt good,” he said.

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices


Top Videos





Privacy