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Poxy Eamonn Holmes could have gone blind after catching 'dangerous' shingles

The dangerous thing about mine was that if it’s on your face, it can affect or maybe impair your eyesight, so that’s the danger with it.”

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Eamonn Holmes

Eamonn Holmes

Eamonn Holmes

TV presenter Eamonn Holmes has revealed that he was close to losing his eyesight after getting shingles.

The Belfast-born broadcaster was forced out of his This Morning presenting duties back in 2018 after contracting the viral infection.

Eamonn’s shingles mostly formed on his face, which he said was “quite brutal” and made him look like Quasimodo from The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Speaking on ITV’s Loose Women recently, he revealed that he was lucky as developing shingles on your face can be very dangerous.

“If you’ve had chickenpox, the virus is there in your system and there’s a very high chance – a 60pc chance – that you will have the shingles,” the 61-year-old explained.

“The dangerous thing about mine was that if it’s on your face, it can affect or maybe impair your eyesight, so that’s the danger with it.”

Eamonn admitted that he “ruined” his son’s wedding photos as he had to have his face bandaged up to prevent spreading the infection to anyone else.

“That was at a time when my eldest son, my only son, was getting married. That was the first marriage in the family and that was the way I looked on the wedding day.

“I had to have it covered up so, as you can imagine, I ruined all the pictures. I didn’t want to be in them. I became the centre of attention with all of this. The timing was awful.”

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Eamonn Holmes

Eamonn Holmes

Eamonn Holmes

While he has since recovered from shingles, Eamonn is now undergoing a number of treatments for his dead right leg.

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He shared: “The thing I’m struggling with at the moment is a dead right leg. I’ve had two dislocated discs for the past five months and I’ve got a dead right leg so I get around now with a cane or a crutch.

“I need treatment and I’m working my way through it with physio and podiatry and hydrotherapy. You name it, I’ve had it.

“I think there’s progression. It’s not as quick as I’d like it to be. It was an innocent injury that came about and it could happen to anyone. We don’t really appreciate our health until it goes.”

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