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life-changing Broadcaster Mark Cagney says he feels 'incredibly lucky' to be alive after suffering stroke

He said he suffered from anxiety and depression in the weeks after his diagnosis, but is speaking out to remind people that there is life after suffering a stroke.

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Mark Cagney, pictured in Dublin. Photo: Damien Eager

Mark Cagney, pictured in Dublin. Photo: Damien Eager

Mark Cagney, pictured in Dublin. Photo: Damien Eager

Broadcaster Mark Cagney has revealed he was struck down by a stroke in January and said despite losing a quarter of his sight he feels "incredibly lucky" to be alive.

He said he suffered from anxiety and depression in the weeks after his diagnosis, but is speaking out to remind people that there is life after suffering a stroke - although things have changed for him.

Mr Cagney (64) spoke candidly about his experience on Newstalk's The Hard Shoulder last night, admitting that he still suffers some anxiety.

"You become aware that strokes don't tend to be singular events... so you are aware that it can happen again," he said.

The veteran broadcaster said he didn't show any of the common signs of having a stroke, like face drooping or loss of feeling in his limbs, so it wasn't until he had MRI scans that doctors knew he had one but possibly two strokes.

Mr Cagney first knew something was wrong when he was driving to his local supermarket on January 8.

He told how he felt his spatial awareness was off and had a ringing "white noise" in his ear.

"I thought 'what the hell is going on, have I eaten?' I was about to pull off (in my car) and I couldn't quite judge the distance between myself and the car in front… my spatial awareness had deserted me."

After asking an assistant in the supermarket if they had the noodles he was looking for, he suddenly collapsed.

"I said thank you very much, turned to walk away and the room just went completely 180 degrees on me," he said.

"I blacked out, collapsed, dropped. I didn't topple, I was straight down on my knees."

An MRI scan at Beaumont Hospital revealed the broadcaster had suffered a stroke, possibly two strokes.

"Effectively, it was a small clot in a large vessel," he said. "Thank God, because if it was the other way around we wouldn't be having this conversation."

The broadcaster said he is "incredibly lucky and incredibly grateful" that he has had "minimal" physical issues afterward.

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