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three and out Amy Huberman on being pregnant during lockdown and how she's had her last baby

Amy Huberman on motherhood and spending most of lockdown pregnant

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Amy Huberman is hosting a new podcast series called Mamia & Me.

Amy Huberman is hosting a new podcast series called Mamia & Me.

Amy Huberman with her husband, former Ireland rugby international Brian O'Driscoll. Photo: Brian Farrell

Amy Huberman with her husband, former Ireland rugby international Brian O'Driscoll. Photo: Brian Farrell

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Amy Huberman is hosting a new podcast series called Mamia & Me.

Amy Huberman has revealed that having her third baby during lockdown was a very different experience from her two previous births.  

“Going into the hospital was very different because there was nobody in there and it was very different to being a first-time mom. It was nice because it was really quiet and I knew this would probably be my last baby so I was really emotional leaving, going ‘Oh well, I won’t be back here’. People say ‘never say never’ but I’m pretty sure I won’t be,” she said.

“Being pregnant for most of lockdown last year, it was lovely to have that distraction and have Ted to look forward to because it kind of took my mind off the worry of everything else.”

The award-winning actress and her husband, former rugby international Brian O’Driscoll, are proud parents to Sadie (8) Billy (6) and baby Ted, who was born last December.

So how does parenting go in the O’Driscoll/Huberman household and what’s the story on good cop/bad cop?

“I think we probably play off each other, and I think if someone’s been bad cop for too much, then we’ll swap over a little bit,” she laughs.

“I don’t think there’s one who is way more a disciplinarian. I would be strict enough. I think I just oscillate between thinking I’m like, you know, hard as nails, and then just feeling like I’m melting like butter.”

As for the pressures of having two famous parents, from the field of rugby and acting, Huberman says: “I would hate the kids to feel under any pressure to do something or not do something.

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Amy Huberman with her husband, former Ireland rugby international Brian O'Driscoll. Photo: Brian Farrell

Amy Huberman with her husband, former Ireland rugby international Brian O'Driscoll. Photo: Brian Farrell

Amy Huberman with her husband, former Ireland rugby international Brian O'Driscoll. Photo: Brian Farrell

“You just want your kids to be happy and to support them in what they want to do. Certainly, there will never be pressure coming from us.”

On parenting, she adds: “If I could talk to first-time-mom me, I would try to cut out half the things in the diary and take as much time as you can to adjust to life.

“It took me a good while to find my feet and now, with Ted, my third child, I feel just so much more relaxed. Maybe it’s to do with age as well. Getting older is great in so many ways, and I just probably care less about things being perfect. It’s just about doing your best.”

With Sadie and Billy just two years apart, she says the early years “felt like a tag-team relay race”.

She recalls a funny story that played out at Holles Street hospital, when Sadie was only a few hours old.

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“I think I was high on life because I was so elated, so happy and I was shouting at the TV screen watching Ireland versus England in the Six Nations.

“Brian was playing after being at the birth and I remember one of the midwives saying ‘can you please keep it down, you’re in a maternity ward’.”

Huberman recalls those early days back in February 2013, when Sadie arrived a week early.

“I was so excited to become a mom, but yes, I was scared. I was definitely scared and I remember just thinking ‘I hope I’m up to this’.”

Motherhood was not something she “segued into seamlessly”.

“It’s such a gear shift in your life, in such a great way, but sometimes in a really overwhelming way as well.”

Sleepless nights become a reality. “My daughter had reflux so that affected her sleep and it took her months, I mean months on end, to sleep through the night.

“The rolling lack of sleep is really difficult on people and then I got in the habit of not sleeping, so even when the kids eventually did sleep, I was so used to that broken sleep... my sleep was not great for years.”

Memories of those early days, like arriving into the hospital with lots of baby clothes but no nappies, forgetting to bring the baby bag, the fog of baby brain and sleepless nights, came flooding back this week.

In her latest venture, the 42-year-old, who is also a best-selling author, is hosting a 12-episode parenting podcast series called Mamia & Me.

The Aldi podcast starts next Monday. Among her guests will be Westlife’s Mark Feehily, who told her that becoming a dad has really shaped the person he is now.

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