| 3.9°C Dublin

Anxious housewife Eva Longoria says everything scares her since becoming a mother

She came to our attention in the iconic TV show Desperate Housewives, now ahead of her new movie Sylvie's Love we talk with the luminous Eva Longoria on anxiety, pandemics and the curious secret of her success

Close

Eva looking glam.

Eva looking glam.

Getty Images

Eva looking glam.

She rose to fame as a Desperate Housewife in the mega-hit series and we recently met up with the fabulous Eva Longoria for a chat - that ranged from anxiety to being a mother during a pandemic.

The 45-year-old star reveals how she is coping with looking after her two-year-old son Santi and how he has changed her life. She chats about her career as an actress, producer and director, her charitable causes and how thrilled she was to be part of Sylvie's Love, which was released on Amazon Prime in December.

SW+: What have you missed most this year due to the global pandemic?

EL: Travelling. I'm normally on a plane every three days. I love travelling. For me, it's one of the greatest luxuries because it really shrinks the world and makes you realise that you live in a global community.

SW+: How are you coping with being a mother at this time?

Close

Eva with husband José Bastón and their son Santi

Eva with husband José Bastón and their son Santi

Eva with husband José Bastón and their son Santi

EL: I love it and I feel so lucky. My son is the centre of my world but the one thing I never realised when I had my baby was how anxious I would be about the world and everything that is happening in the news right now. Everything scares me and my anxiety has just gone through the roof. It's made everything I do, especially my philanthropic and charity work, more intense. It's like, 'I have to do something!'

SW+: You support your many causes on top of acting, directing, producing and being a mother. How are you able to maintain it all?

EL: Everything is important so you have got to have the air war and the ground war at the same time. That's how you prioritise. All of the issues and disparities that our communities face all overlap.

Socio-economic status overlaps with job loss. Job loss has been compounded by Covid. Covid has been compounded by people not having access to healthcare. It's all important.

SW+: Let's talk about your new movie. Why did you choose to be a part of Sylvie's Love?

EL: I didn't choose this, it chose me! Nnamdi Asomugha called and said he was doing this movie and asked if I would be a part of it. I said, 'Yes!' before I had even read anything. Then, once I signed on, he was like, 'Oh, by the way, you're singing, dancing and there is six weeks of rehearsals'. I was like, 'What? Wait! What am I doing?' But it was so much fun because I don't ever get these roles or to be in a period piece, let alone be able to sing and dance.

SW+: In what way do you think this film is relevant to the world today?

EL: At the end of the day it is a love story and we all have love stories through our lives. Love endures time so it is always relevant. Sylvie's Love is a romantic version of this time period, especially for people of colour. You really get into that and I am so proud to be a part of it.

Close

Nnamdi Asomugha and Tessa Thompson

Nnamdi Asomugha and Tessa Thompson

Courtesy of Amazon Studios

Nnamdi Asomugha and Tessa Thompson

SW+: It's 20 years since you started out in Hollywood. What would you say is the secret to your success?

EL: Being curious. When I moved to Hollywood 20 years ago, I was an extra. I was so curious. I would always be on set and I'd be asking questions, 'What's a mark? What's that? What's checking the gate?' They were like, 'Can somebody move the extra? This chick is bugging us!' I talked to the camera guy, I talked to the boom guy, I talked to the lighting people, I talked to the grips. I just wanted to know everything. I carried that with me throughout my career. When I started Desperate Housewives, I was even more curious. I'm still curious.

SW+: What lessons did you take away from your time on Desperate Housewives?

EL: Housewives was an amazing teaching ground for me. Again, I was always asking questions and I had so many amazing people there with me, directors, crew members, writers... It was so awesome to have experienced a decade of my life with such talented people.

SW+: You have been part of an effort to have more equal representation on screen but is there still room for improvement?

EL: Definitely. Unfortunately, there is still an archaic television system - that goes for streaming as well - in which they develop all of this stuff and then have the one Latino project and the one Black project. Why can't we put them all on? You can't keep tapping the same well for talent, in front and behind the camera. Innovation comes from diversity, from different perspectives and different storytellers.

Close

Eva Longoria Baston (David Parry/PA)

Eva Longoria Baston (David Parry/PA)

PA Archive/PA Images

Eva Longoria Baston (David Parry/PA)

SW+: Why did you decide to combine your activism with documentary making?

EL: I naturally gravitate to real life. I don't read fiction, probably because I have to read so many scripts. When I read a book, it's always a memoir, self-help or Constitution for dummies (laughs). I like searching for the truth. That's why I love documentaries. Even in the shows that I produce and direct, I love stories that are true or based on true events. I really like to bring the art form of storytelling from the actual source.

SW+: Finally, what is the best advice you have ever received?

Close

Eva with some of  the cast of Desperate Housewives

Eva with some of the cast of Desperate Housewives

Eva with some of the cast of Desperate Housewives

EL: I was going for some directing job and a really good friend of mine, a writer who I was practice-pitching to, said, 'OK, I gotta stop you. Walk out of the door, come back in with your white male privileged pants on and start again. I want you to act like you've got the job.' That was an 'A-ha!' moment for me. Now I walk into rooms and assume I'm the best person for the job, as opposed to hoping they hire me. That piece of advice gave me permission to be great and to assume equality, as opposed to asking for it.

⬤ Sylvie's Love is on Amazon Prime.

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices

Sunday World


Privacy