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brave survivor Linda Nolan opens up about the painful side effects of chemotherapy

Linda was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006.

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Linda Nolan went public with her cancer battle

Linda Nolan went public with her cancer battle

Linda Nolan went public with her cancer battle

Linda Nolan has opened up about the painful side effects of chemotherapy. 

The 63-year-old singer who was diagnosed with untreatable secondary breast cancer said that her chemotherapy treatment leaves her with neuropathic pain in her feet and fingers.

"My cancer isn't curable, it's treatable," she said on Good Morning Britain.

"I'm having a kind of palliative treatment. I'm having chemo once a week."

When host Richard Bacon asked her about her treatment the previous day, she said she was feeling “fine.”

“Because it's once a week it's not as harsh as, like Anne had it every three weeks and they batter you with it and it's really aggressive. But for me, because it's palliative, it's not as full-on so I feel OK.”

"My legs are a bit wobbly and I have neuropathic pain in my feet and my fingers which is like really bad pins and needles all the time," she added.

Linda was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006.

By 2007 she was diagnosed with cellulitis and lymphedema in her arm and secondary cancer on her pelvis in 2017.

In March 2020, Linda was told that her cancer had affected her liver.

She then underwent chemotherapy until September that year.

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The singer revealed that having untreatable cancer has given her a “little sense of freedom” so that she can prioritise what she really wants to do.

"It puts a new perspective on life for me because I don't know how long I've got left and I just want to make memories and have a great time," she explained.

Her sister Anne, who appeared alongside her on the show, has been cancer-free since 2020.

She said it felt “strange” to her that she is cancer free while her sister is still suffering.

"It is really strange because sometimes, I mean I don't feel guilt because it's not my fault that Linda's cancer hasn't gone and mine has, but I feel empathy towards her because I know what she's going through,” she said.

“I've been there and had chemo and lost my hair so I can relate to how she's feeling."

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