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Comment Ronan Keating proves birth control is a boys' zone too


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Ronan Keating and Storm Keating

Ronan Keating and Storm Keating

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Ronan Keating and Storm Keating

'Schnipp-Schnapp!' I was more than a little tickled by a German headline about Ronan Keating's upcoming vasectomy this week.

Appearing on Good Morning Britain on Thursday, the singer revealed he's set to get "the snip", nine months after welcoming his fifth child, Coco, with wife Storm.

"It was a funny conversation because I was just going about my day not too long ago and Storm just says, 'It's probably about time you got the snip now', and I was like 'What?'

"Storm said 'It's time', and I said 'OK, I guess it is, yeah, sure, I'll give it a go'. But, look, five healthy, wonderful children, I'm really, really truly blessed, and I think it is time, I do."

Now, ordinarily, I might tell Ronan: "You say it best when you say nothing at all."

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As the world prepares to celebrate the birth of the baby Jesus later this month though, I applaud the former Boyzone singer for speaking up about his own boyz.

At 39, the Australian fashion designer - who wed the star in 2015 - is still in the eye of the reproductive Storm.

So "fair play", as Ronan himself might say, to the 43-year-old for sacking up and going under the knife.

Admittedly, the Dubliner has some way to go before he catches up with 'super father' Genghis Khan, estimated by scientists to have up to 16 million male descendants.

Still, with a blended family also including three-year-old son Cooper, as well as his older children Ali (15), Missy (19) and Jack (21) with ex-wife Yvonne Connolly, it's no wonder that Ro is keen to "give it a go".

With the exception of Dax Shepard, who underwent a vasectomy after a pregnancy scare, and Ozzy Osbourne, who later had the procedure reversed, it's rare to hear male celebrities open up about sterilisation.

So it's little wonder that one in 10 Irish men think it involves removing the testicles, according to research by Irish Life Health or that 19 per cent fear it will affect their sexual prowess.

You've got to be taking the mickey.

Using technology invented by Charles Goodyear, rubber condoms were first rolled out as far back as 1855.

Before that, men simply swaddled their bits in everything from linen to goat's bladder, and hoped for the best.

Incredibly, 165 years on, not much has changed when it comes to male birth control.

While women have Femidoms, the pill, coil, contraceptive patch, ring and injection, among other ways to remain child-free, men have just three choices: wrap it, snip it or zip it.

Hopes for a male contraceptive pill were boosted last year after a once-daily tablet passed initial human safety tests.

With scientists warning it could be a decade before the product hits the market, however, and only around half of men willing to put it to the testes, mild side-effects including weight gain may not be the only bump along the way.

No Matter What, we need more celebrities like Ronan to show that making babies is no longer just a woman's zone.

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