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humanitarian basis Up to 150 Afghan refugees will not have to go into direct provision upon arrival into Ireland

Nobody facing deportation orders will be sent from Ireland to Afghanistan

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A Taliban fighter runs towards crowd outside Kabul airport, Afghanistan in this still image taken from a video. Photo: REUTERS TV/via REUTERS

A Taliban fighter runs towards crowd outside Kabul airport, Afghanistan in this still image taken from a video. Photo: REUTERS TV/via REUTERS

A Taliban fighter runs towards crowd outside Kabul airport, Afghanistan in this still image taken from a video. Photo: REUTERS TV/via REUTERS

Up to 150 Afghan refugees will not have to go into direct provision upon their arrival into Ireland, the Irish Independent has learned.

The Government is set to receive up to 150 refugees from Afghanistan as the country is taken over by the Taliban regime and thousands flee to safety.

Minister for Children and Equality Roderic O’Gorman will issue refugee status on a humanitarian basis to individuals chosen by the Department of Foreign Affairs.

This means that they will not have to go into direct provision, a system which Minister O’Gorman is seeking to abolish.

The refugees will be brought to Ireland under the Irish Refugee Protection Programme, a spokesperson for the Minister confirmed.

There is also “no question” that any people with a deportation order to Afghanistan who live in Ireland will actually be deported, a spokesperson for the Department of Justice said.

There are “a number” of deportation orders against Afghan nationals who currently live in Ireland.

“While there are a number of deportation orders in place for Afghan nationals who have not qualified for permission to live here, there is no question of any people being returned to Afghanistan given the current situation,” said the spokesperson.

Harrowing footage on Monday showed Afghan nationals desperately trying to jump on air planes leaving Kabul airport in a frantic rush to flee.

There are a total of 15 Irish people who are currently trying to leave the country, out of a total of 23 Irish nationals, some with dual citizenship.

Taoiseach Micheal Martin said that support is being provided to fly them back to Ireland on commercial flights.

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Mr Martin said that he is “deeply concerned” by the situation in Afghanistan, saying that “protecting lives, meeting humanitarian needs and respecting people’s human rights” is paramount.

It is feared that the Taliban will bring back a regime which is extremely suppressive on women, including forced marriages, being forbidden from working, going to school or going out in public without a male companion.

An “uncertain future awaits” women in Afghanistan, according to Geraldine Byrne Nason, Ireland’s UN representative on the Security Council, who condemned the “deliberate targeting of girls and women” by the Taliban.

She said that the rights of women in Afghanistan should be the “shared priority” and “shared responsibility” of the UN and that their rights should be protected.

“The Taliban have reportedly said that women have nothing to fear from them, yet we hear multiple and credible reports of summary executions, forced marriages and of sexual and gender based violence,” she said.

“Telling the international community what it wants to hear will fool no one.”

Minister for Foreign Affairs Simon Coveney described the events of the last week in Afghanistan as a “catastrophic foreign policy failure”.

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