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Good Nudes OnlyFans suspends controversial planned ban on sexually explicit content

“OnlyFans stands for inclusion and we will continue to provide a home for all creators.”

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OnlyFans has announced a ban on explicit content from October 1 (Tali Arbel/AP)

OnlyFans has announced a ban on explicit content from October 1 (Tali Arbel/AP)

OnlyFans has announced a ban on explicit content from October 1 (Tali Arbel/AP)

OnlyFans has reversed its controversial decision to ban sexually explicit content less than a week after announcing the change.

The online subscription service, which is popular among sex workers, recently announced new rules coming into effect in October that prohibit “any content containing sexually explicit conduct”, though non-sexual nudity will still be permitted.

On Wednesday, the platform - where sex workers, celebrities, and influencers charge fans for pictures, videos and customised content - announced that it had settled agreements with banks to allow all OnlyFans creators to continue making money from their content.

In a tweet, the company said: “Thank you to everyone for making your voices heard. We have secured assurances necessary to support our diverse creator community and have suspended the planned October 1 policy change.

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OnlyFans is suspending its plan to ban sexually explicit photographs and videos (PA

OnlyFans is suspending its plan to ban sexually explicit photographs and videos (PA

OnlyFans is suspending its plan to ban sexually explicit photographs and videos (PA

“OnlyFans stands for inclusion and we will continue to provide a home for all creators.”

A representative for the company declined to comment on which bank or banks this agreement was made with but said: “The proposed Oct. 1, 2021 changes are no longer required due to banking partners’ assurances that OnlyFans can support all genres of creators.”

The Sex Workers Alliance Ireland (SWAI) has welcomed the news and said the reversal of the pornography ban was achieved by rallying from the sex work community.

Aoife Bloom, a board member of SWAI said that OnlyFans’ initial decision to ban explicit content came as a huge blow as many sex workers were earning a living from online work due to the pandemic.

“Throughout the pandemic the number of OnlyFans content creators increased dramatically which undoubtedly increased the profits for the shareholder immensely,” she said.

“The platform allows workers to set their own time, be their own boss and avoid exploitative pornography production companies.”

She added that sex workers would have been forced to look for in-person work, which may have put them in danger.

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“Reducing the income of sex workers does nothing to end exploitation and trafficking in the industry and in fact makes sex workers less safe.

“Sex workers could have been forced to move away from OnlyFans into in-person work. This loss of income could have forced workers into taking risks such as not using condoms or taking on clients that they would normally turn down.

“It is clear that anti-sex work ideology is more important than mitigating risk for people working in the industry.”

OnlyFans is predominantly used by sex workers but a number of celebrities, musicians and comedians also use it for non-sexual content.

Creators receive 80% commission on their earnings, while the remaining 20% goes to the London-based firm, covering “referral payments, payment processing, hosting, support, and all other services”.

Some users of the platform criticised the policy change when it was first announced, with some stating that they intended to look elsewhere following the announcement, while others were anxious about what the future holds.

Initially, the company said the move was being introduced due to pressure from financial partners, leading some to assume payment processors Mastercard and Visa were behind it.

However, chief executive Tim Stokely later said in an interview it was “unfair” banks had prompted the change over concerns about “reputational risk."

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