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Where's Wally Wally the wandering Walrus vanishes once again after sightings in Wales and Kerry

The Arctic walrus, who was first spotted on March 14 plonked down on the rocks of Valentia island later reappeared in Pembrokeshire last month

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Wally wallowing in the Welsh sunshine last month

Wally wallowing in the Welsh sunshine last month

Wally wallowing in the Welsh sunshine last month

Wally the Walrus, who made headlines around the world when he arrived on a beach in Co Kerry after apparently falling asleep on a drifting iceberg, has vanished once again after being hounded by tourists in Wales.

The Arctic walrus, who was first spotted on March 14 plonked down on the rocks of Valentia island by a five-year-old girl out walking with her father, later reappeared in Pembrokeshire last month.

But since landing in Wales, Wally has become something of a local celebrity, attracting crowds who flocked in over the Easter weekend, with some driving from as far as Essex to catch a glimpse.

This added to the paddle boarders, jet skis and even people swimming out to get close to it, Welsh Marine Life Rescue told ITV News.

The animal, which was left “obviously disturbed” by the attention, has not been spotted since early morning on Easter Monday, the rescue service said.

"It was an absolute nightmare trying to keep people away,” Terry Leadbetter, coordinator and founder of Welsh Marine Life Rescue, said.

"There were even people flying drones trying to get close. People were getting within a couple of metres of the walrus."

Terry added: "Wally was aware that people were there and was obviously disturbed.

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The walrus on Valentia Island. Picture: Alan Houlihan © Eye Focus LTD

The walrus on Valentia Island. Picture: Alan Houlihan © Eye Focus LTD

The walrus on Valentia Island. Picture: Alan Houlihan © Eye Focus LTD

"People have been trying to get too close to the walrus for whatever reason, and it's a wild animal, it's not like being in a zoo. He would be unaware of human contact.

"Walruses have been known to attack boats and they've been known to kill people so like any other wild animal you don't want to get too close just in case.

"These people are just going up to it and taking their chances. They are unpredictable, and you don't know if they are likely to turn around and attack someone or not.

"Someone who is acting irresponsibly could get injured."

Mr Leadbetter added that he'd heard reports of people travelling from as far as Essex and Leeds to see Wally, breaking Covid restrictions to try and get a glimpse of him.

"I get that it is a bit of a sensation, and when he was hauled out on the slipway it caused a lot of attention," Mr Leadbetter said.

"But walruses are a dangerous creature and their great set of tusks can easily injure someone."

Experts are not sure how Wally ended up in Co Kerry, thousands of miles from his usual Arctic hangout, but one marine biologist speculated that the animal fell asleep on a drifting iceberg.

He later travelled 450km farther south, from County Kerry to Pembrokeshire, Wales, in just six days.

Since then, Wally, who was visually identified by a conservation group as the same walrus seen in Ireland, has been stirring up mischief by hitching rides on passing ships.

Last month, Wally was seen capsizing a dinghy boat before attempting to climb onto a fishing boat moored in the Tenby harbour.

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