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New study Women and younger people significantly less likely to get Covid-19 vaccine, research finds

Women aged under 30 were least likely to say they would get a Covid-19 vaccine, with less than 70pc indicating a positive response and 20pc indicating high levels of uncertainty

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Women aged under 30 were the least likely to say they would get a Covid-19 vaccine. Stock image

Women aged under 30 were the least likely to say they would get a Covid-19 vaccine. Stock image

Women aged under 30 were the least likely to say they would get a Covid-19 vaccine. Stock image

Young women are the most reluctant to accept a Covid-19 vaccine, new research has found.

A vaccine hesitancy study conducted by NUI Galway in collaboration with the University of Huddersfield in the UK indicates that there are high levels of uncertainty among young women about the safety of such vaccines.

The project surveyed the views of 1,000 people online in Ireland and the UK, recording their attitudes to Covid-19 vaccination programmes.

The research revealed that out of those who participated in the survey, three in four people intend to get a Covid-19 vaccine.

However, 11pc of participants said they would not take a vaccine if they were offered one, and 14pc said that they were unsure.

Women and younger people were significantly less likely to report that they would accept a vaccine.

Women aged under 30 were least likely to say they would get a Covid-19 vaccine, with less than 70pc indicating a positive response and 20pc indicating high levels of uncertainty.

It is possible, however, that the high level of vaccine hesitancy among young women comes from the fear of infertility, blood clotting, and other health issues.

Dr Jane Walsh, Senior Lecturer in Psychology and Director of the Mobile Technology and Health (mHealth) Research Group at NUI Galway, said: “Understanding vaccine hesitancy is key to addressing public concerns, promoting confidence and increasing vaccine uptake.

“It is possible, that one of the reasons behind young women’s reluctance to signal an intention to get a Covid-19 vaccine is related to issues around fertility and this warrants further investigation.”

The survey also indicated that peer and social influences are strongly associated with young women’s opinions on Covid-19 vaccines.

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Dr Walsh continued: “This influence was particularly strong in the ‘no’ and ‘unsure’ group. These findings suggest that messages that are channelled through relevant social influencers may have a significant impact on vaccine uptake.

“It is also concerning that those who vote ‘no’ to the vaccine have a lower sense of civic responsibility.

“But what is clear, in general, is that there is still a high level of uncertainty around Covid-19 vaccination.”

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