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Charity run Wexford man hoping to make history in 643km triathlon from Dublin to London in 72 hours

If successful, Ryan Davin will be the first person to complete the 400-mile trek powered by human muscle alone

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Ryan Davin from Gorey, Co Wexford leaving Arklow for Wales after he ran from Dublin.Photo: Mark Condren

Ryan Davin from Gorey, Co Wexford leaving Arklow for Wales after he ran from Dublin.Photo: Mark Condren

Ryan Davin from Gorey, Co Wexford leaving Arklow for Wales after he ran from Dublin.Photo: Mark Condren

An ex-pat Irishman from Wexford is hoping to make history this weekend after embarking on a 400-mile (643km) triathlon from the heart of Dublin to London Bridge in just 72 hours.

Ryan Davin from Gorey, Co Wexford, kicked off his mammoth journey from Dublin’s Spire just after midnight on Wednesday where he ran 96km from the O’Connell Street landmark through south Dublin and the Wicklow Mountains along the Wicklow Way before arriving in Arklow, Co Wexford around 2pm on Thursday.

After a break for just over two hours to catch his breath, he then set out on a 154km rowing trip across the Irish Sea with former stuntman Matthew Pritchard and skipper and celebrity chef Danny O’Brien and another experienced sea rower who will take turns rowing two hours shifts before reaching Aberystwyth, Wales around 6pm on Friday, depending on sea conditions.

From there, the human resources executive for Transport for London who has lived in the UK capital for the past nine years, will cycle 394km to the 72-storey skyscraper known as The Shard overlooking London Bridge where he expects to arrive around 4pm on Sunday.

If successful, he will be the first person to complete the 400-mile trek powered by human muscle alone. But the affable, Irish-Mexican, who goes by the nickname Chillishamrock on his Instragram account, insists he’s no superman.

“I’m nothing special - but I want to show people what you can do when you put your mind to it. It's mainly for myself. But I also want to show people that everyone has the ability to achieve big, crazy things,” he said.

“You don't have to be a big athlete. I'm nothing special - but I want to show people what you can do when you put your mind to it. You can achieve major things."

However, he is realistic about the challenges facing him as he crosses the Irish Sea, which can be extremely choppy and challenging at times. “Although I want to complete it within that certain time, I've got some reservations in regards to just how long that row will take because the more experienced rowers I speak to, they're telling me it could take up to between 30 to 60 hours just for the row alone.”

But even if he doesn’t make the trip in the 72-hour window, he said the journey will be worth the effort.

"I want to have kids someday and the way the world is going, it's just slowly deteriorating, so I want to try and show that anything can be done with a bit of effort.”

He hopes to raise funds for the Irish mental health charity ‘A Lust for Life’ and the UK’s Mental Health Foundation as well as raise awareness of environmentally-friendly modes of transport.

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“If I can do a 400-mile triathlon from Dublin to London just to raise awareness of zero-carbon travel then people can think about taking that 10 or 20-minute cycle to work instead of using a car, or walking where possible,” he said.

His sponsor, The Naked Collective beverage company plans to make a documentary about the trip.

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