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Good neighbours University of Limerick to take action following complaints of unruly student parties

'We want students to enjoy coming to college, but the University will firmly address behaviour that disrupts the campus and local community'

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Cllr Seán Hartigan took to Twitter to share the images that show streets strewn with debris including cans, bottles and paper, and knocked over wheelie bins in a residential estate. 

Cllr Seán Hartigan took to Twitter to share the images that show streets strewn with debris including cans, bottles and paper, and knocked over wheelie bins in a residential estate. 

Cllr Seán Hartigan took to Twitter to share the images that show streets strewn with debris including cans, bottles and paper, and knocked over wheelie bins in a residential estate. 

The University of Limerick has said they will “firmly address behaviour that disrupts the campus and local community” following ongoing complaints regarding  unruly student parties off-campus. 

In one of the latest incidents it has been reported locally that gardai were investigating after a concrete bollard was thrown through the front window of a home in Limerick city.

Garda John Finnerty, who said the incident that happened at Carysfort Avenue, College Court, Castletroy in the early hours of Saturday morning, was “quite frightening” for the occupants of the house who were asleep at the time.

According to the Limerick Leader he said there was a large number of students around Carysfort Avenue and College Court in general in the early hours of last Saturday morning.

“If you were one of them and you witnessed this incident, then we would like to hear from you," said Garda Finnerty who is attached to Henry Street station.

Separately, it has also been reported the University is to investigate whether students from the college were involved in “seriously damaging” another house in the Castletroy area.

“While an official investigation will determine whether UL students were involved, the public perception is nevertheless that student parties in off-campus housing are reaching unacceptable levels,” an email sent to students on Friday afternoon reads, according to the Limerick Leader.

Sundayworld.com also reported earlier this month how one local councillor posted pictures and video footage of the aftermath of “student parties” in estates located near the University of Limerick as he called for a larger Garda presence.

Cllr Seán Hartigan took to Twitter to share the images that show streets strewn with debris including cans, bottles and paper, and knocked over wheelie bins in a residential estate.

Alongside the video he has written: “Estates near UL are destroyed after student parties, huge volumes of cars blocking footpaths. Roads, footpaths and cycle lanes littered with glass. 2,000 person party in College Court last night. (Monday).

He adds: “Residents and students who couldn't get sleep last night. Garda couldn't attend as were dealing with other incidents.

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“We need a large Garda presence in the area and UL need to engage and have an off campus code of conduct as I have repeatedly requested.”

In response to sundayworld.com, a spokesperson for the University said they could not comment on any specific incident as “that would be a matter for An Garda Siochana or, in this case, the property owner of a private house that is located off-campus”.

However, the spokesperson said that the University had spent the summer planning for a return to as near normal teaching as possible this September, “while also recognising the need to keep the community safe”.

“UL appreciates that there is understandable concern in the surrounding community about the return of large numbers of young people from across the country,” the spokesperson said.

“Appeals have been made to those living in off-campus rented accommodation to be responsible and a good neighbour to those around them.”

The spokesperson added that UL is working with An Garda Síochána and funding extra Garda patrols of the estates in the vicinity of the campus to help keep everyone safe.

“While UL cannot be a responder to off-campus incidents, which are the jurisdiction of An Garda Síochána and other relevant agencies, any student who has been officially reported, investigated and found to have broken the UL Code of Conduct will face sanction,” the spokesperson stated.

“Allegations of breaches of the UL Code of Conduct must be made to the Complaints, Discipline and Vetting Unit of the University.

"Once a complaint has been made, it is assessed by the Advocate and, where it is within the jurisdiction of the University, dealt with as deemed appropriate. The complainant is asked to provide sufficient information to enable the University Advocate to undertake an investigation.

"The Advocate is an independent officer who is empowered to investigate and prosecute complaints about alleged violations of the University’s Code of Conduct by students.”

The statement adds that UL Interim Provost and Deputy President Professor Nigel Healey has appealed to any landlord renting an off-campus property to UL students to contact the University and report students who engage in behaviour that is likely to bring the University of Limerick into disrepute.

“We want students to enjoy coming to college, but the University will firmly address behaviour that disrupts the campus and local community in accordance with procedures outlined in the UL Student Code of Conduct,” said Professor Healey.

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