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pay-offs Two former senior gardaí retire with lump sum pension payments of over €200k

The Garda FOI unit confirmed the top lump sum paid out in 2020 was to a retiring senior garda.

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Member of Garda Siochana. (Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Member of Garda Siochana. (Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Member of Garda Siochana. (Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

TWO former senior gardaí received lump sum pension payments of more than €200,000 last year on retiring from the force.

Confirmation of the retirement pay-offs comes as Justice Minister Helen McEntee revealed that 48 gardaí who were due to retire had agreed to remain on for an additional 12 months to help with the Garda response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

In response to a Freedom of Information (FOI) request, the Garda FOI unit confirmed the top lump sum paid out in 2020 was to a retiring senior garda who received €212,595 with a second receiving €210,989.

A further 12 Garda members shared pension lump sums of between €150,000 and €200,000.

The Garda FOI unit did not provide the rank or location of the gardaí concerned as it was deemed personal information.

The total amount paid in pension lump sums last year was €27m. This amount was divided out among 250 gardaí who retired last year.

Meanwhile, Ms McEntee said that 43 applications from Garda members at different ranks have been approved for 12-month extensions to their compulsory retirement ages.

It's part of Commissioner Drew Harris's action plan to deal with the impact of Covid-19 on public order and policing matters. In a written Dáil response to Independent TD Michael Healy-Rae, Ms McEntee confirmed that a further four applications are currently being considered.

She said that in addition to those retirement age extensions, she had approved two other retirement age extensions last year.

"These extensions, of two-year duration, were requested by the Garda Commissioner for two members of Garda senior management, at the rank of Assistant Commissioner."

"In support of these requests, the Garda Commissioner highlighted the organisational risk that would be posed by the loss of leadership and the lack of continuity in these strategic senior posts."

Ms McEntee said a review of the compulsory retirement age is currently being carried out by her department.

The mandatory retirement age for all members is 60 and gardaí who joined before April 1, 2004, may retire on a full pension at 50 once they have served at least 30 years.

Those who joined on or after April 1, 2004, may retire on a full pension at 55 years of age with 30 years' service.

Gardaí have the option of continuing to serve until they reach 60, subject to the Garda Commissioner being satisfied they are fully competent and available to do their duties.

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