| 6.8°C Dublin

Trucker turmoil Truck driver convoys set to bring their voices to the Government's door today

Petrol and diesel prices are up 27.5pc on last year, adding a huge cost to the transport sector

Close

A garda directs truck drivers during a protest at Merrion Square

A garda directs truck drivers during a protest at Merrion Square

A garda directs truck drivers during a protest at Merrion Square

Rising fuel prices that have helped push inflation to a 20-year high are the reason truck drivers from all over the country are due to arrive in Dublin in convoys this morning to bring their voice to the Government's door.

They did it on November 24, bringing widespread chaos, and they promised to be back if nothing was done to make fuel cheaper at the pumps, not just for commercial drivers but for everyone.

Petrol and diesel prices are up 27.5pc on last year, adding a huge cost to the transport sector.

But the drivers you see aiming their tractor units and trucks for Leinster House today are not represented by the Irish Road Haulage Association (IRHA), which has been looking after truckers' interests since 1973.

They are disillusioned drivers who have come together under the Facebook flag of the Irish Truckers & Haulage Association Against Fuel Prices (ITHAAFP).

There is no single identifiable spokesperson for the group, no office and no address, presumably to make it easier to avoid legal challenges to its actions.

Whoever is behind the Facebook page has urged individual drivers to tell their own stories to the media in an effort to get their message across.

But this has also led to a Monty Pythonesque scenario similar to the People's Front of Judea and the Judean People's Front from the movie The Life of Brian. Who is representing who?

At the last protest, the ITHAAFP had no identifiable leader to meet with a TD or minister.

And it had nobody to stand in front of hundreds of truck drivers and rally them into a unified front.

Instead, drivers hung around in small groups by their cabs, not knowing what to do or when to go home.

They were joined briefly by Michael and Danny Healy-Rae, but it did not advance their cause much.

Sunday World Newsletter

Sign up for the latest news and updates

This field is required This field is required

Meanwhile, the IRHA is in discussions with Government, thrashing out details on its many issues and difficulties, including rising fuel prices.

They sat down together as recently as last Friday.

It is hard to know if some of the ITHAAFP group have now split from the IRHA altogether, or if they have a foot in each camp, waiting to see what happens next.

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices


Top Videos





Privacy