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Support Rosanna Davison backs same-sex parents who are viewed as 'legal strangers'

'I have had to live with the knowledge that should the very worst happen to me, there is a chance that our children might not remain with their other mother.'

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Rosanna and baby Hugo

Rosanna and baby Hugo

Rosanna and baby Hugo

Rosanna Davison is showing support for a same-sex couple who are campaigning for equal rights to their children.

The mum-of-three is using her platform to amplify the voice of gay couples who conceived through IVF and surrogacy in their fight to be legally recognised as co-parents.

In a show of solidarity, Rosanna who welcomed baby Sophia in 2019 via a gestational surrogate, following her fertility struggles which saw her endure 14 miscarriages handed over her Instagram account to the cause.

As part of her 'follow Friday takeover' on Instagram, Rosanna who announced her miracle pregnancy last year, which resulted in the arrival of twins Hugo and Oscar in November 2020 turned her social media account over to LGBT+ parental rights activist Ranae Von Meding.

The CEO of the non-profit organisation Equality for Children who shares two children with her wife, Audrey, is hoping to shine a spotlight on the discrimination faced by the majority of LGBT+ couples.

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Ranae von Meding (right), with her wife Audrey Rooney and their children Ava and Arya

Ranae von Meding (right), with her wife Audrey Rooney and their children Ava and Arya

Ranae von Meding (right), with her wife Audrey Rooney and their children Ava and Arya

Speaking directly to Rosanna’s 277K followers, in an emotional Instagram post the devoted mum wrote:

“Conceiving our first child in the wake of marriage equality in Ireland was like a dream. Wrapped up in our little bubble of happiness, we went through that pregnancy with a sense of hope for our future. We got married when I was five months along and we celebrated a future that was finally equal. Little did we know what lay ahead of us.

“Toward the end of my pregnancy, we learned something that devastated us. LGBTQ+ parents in Ireland were still not equal. I remember feeling so overwhelmed with emotions and going through various stages of shock. My first reaction was ‘but we are married and we voted for marriage equality last year.’

Despite the enactment of the Child and Family Relationships Act earlier this year which signalled for the first time in Ireland, that both partners in certain female same-sex couples will each be recognised as their children’s legal parents, the strict criteria around the act does not guarantee all same-sex couples from having automatic legal recognition as parents.

“Equality should extend to the whole family unit. But many parents are still not allowed to establish a legal relationship with their child if they don’t meet the extremely specific criteria. And yes, I’m angry about it. So much of my time with my young family has been stolen from me. I’ve had to spend time fighting for something that should have just been a basic human and children’s right from the start.

“We are being told that our families are different. Our children are being ‘othered’ because of the sex of their parents, and because of how and where they were conceived and born. And of course it’s clear to see that the discrimination extends to children born through any non-traditional manner. Did you know 1 in 6 heterosexual couples require AHR treatment to grow their families?

“While on a day-to-day basis our family has always been widely accepted into our community, the fact remains that I have had to do things differently than if I were married to a man. We’ve had to jump through hoops and do things that no parent should have to do. I had to sign two affidavits signing away any knowledge of my wife Audrey in order to obtain passports for our kids.

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"I have to be the one to register them for financial, educational and medical institutions- as if I’m a single parent. I have had to live with the knowledge that should the very worst happen to me, there is a chance that our children might not remain with their other mother.

"Until all children are equally protected, I don’t believe that we can say we live in an equal Ireland. No one is equal until we all are.”

To show your support visit equalityforchildren.ie

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