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SHOCK SURVEY Over 30pc of Irish people would refuse Covid-19 vaccine

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An employee of SinoVac works in a lab at a factory producing its SARS CoV-2 Vaccine for COVID-19 named CoronaVac in Beijing on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. SinoVac's CEO says they have injected 90 percent of its employees and family members, or about 3,000 people, and provided tens of thousands of rounds of CoronaVac to the municipal government of Beijing. It's a highly unusual move that raises ethical and safety questions, as companies and governments worldwide race to develop a vaccine that will stop the spread of the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

An employee of SinoVac works in a lab at a factory producing its SARS CoV-2 Vaccine for COVID-19 named CoronaVac in Beijing on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. SinoVac's CEO says they have injected 90 percent of its employees and family members, or about 3,000 people, and provided tens of thousands of rounds of CoronaVac to the municipal government of Beijing. It's a highly unusual move that raises ethical and safety questions, as companies and governments worldwide race to develop a vaccine that will stop the spread of the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

AP

An employee of SinoVac works in a lab at a factory producing its SARS CoV-2 Vaccine for COVID-19 named CoronaVac in Beijing on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. SinoVac's CEO says they have injected 90 percent of its employees and family members, or about 3,000 people, and provided tens of thousands of rounds of CoronaVac to the municipal government of Beijing. It's a highly unusual move that raises ethical and safety questions, as companies and governments worldwide race to develop a vaccine that will stop the spread of the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

A staggering 32pc of Irish people would not get a Coronavirus vaccine if one becomes available, new research has shown.

The shocking statistic was unveiled as part of a new poll commissioned by the national broadcaster six months into the pandemic.

The aim of the poll was to gauge the mood of the nation and to see what the general public fears most in the months ahead.

The survey, carried out by Behaviours and Attitudes on behalf of RTÉ, examined how people across the country have adapted since the start of the crisis.

It asked participants, aged 12-years-old and up, about their outlook in areas such as mental and physical health, the economy, finances, family and going back to work and school.

Unsurprisingly, 57pc of people said they are "re-evaluating what they are doing with their lives" since the pandemic took hold in March.

And 33pc of people said their mental health has suffered in the last six months.

The results also showed that some positives came out of the lockdown, with 90pc of teenagers participants saying they value their family life more now than before.

Looking to the future, the survey asked people would they take the first publicly available EU approved vaccine for Covid-19.

Overall, 56pc said they would likely take the vaccine, 32 per cent said they would be unlikely to take the vaccine and 12 percent said they didn’t know.

Extensive results from RTÉ’s state of the nation survey will be revealed Thursday night on The Next Normal, on RTÉ One at 9.35pm.

Online Editors