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inquest hearing No evidence 'undue force' used on gangster 'Dublin Jimmy' who died while being detained

Chesterfield Coroner’s Court was told McGuinness, who “already had a diseased heart” collapsed 60-90 minutes later at the address on Rockfield Road and was pronounced dead at around 10am.

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Cyril "Dublin Jimmy" McGuinness (right) was a suspect in the kidnap of Irish businessman Kevin Lunney (inset left)

Cyril "Dublin Jimmy" McGuinness (right) was a suspect in the kidnap of Irish businessman Kevin Lunney (inset left)

Cyril "Dublin Jimmy" McGuinness (right) was a suspect in the kidnap of Irish businessman Kevin Lunney (inset left)

An inquest into the death of notorious gang boss Cyril 'Dublin Jimmy' McGuinness, who died while being detained by police, has heard investigators found no evidence to suggest 'undue' force was used.

McGuinness (54) collapsed as police searched his home in Buxton, Derbyshire, in 2019. He was pronounced dead shortly afterwards.

A pre-inquest review into his death took place on Thursday.

An earlier inquest had heard how McGuinness was seen to smoke three cigarettes and drink a cup of tea while sitting on a sofa following his arrest at around 7am on November 8.

Chesterfield Coroner’s Court was told McGuinness, who “already had a diseased heart” collapsed 60-90 minutes later at the address on Rockfield Road and was pronounced dead at around 10am.

Police called an ambulance and attempted resuscitation immediately but the 54-year-old died almost three hours after his arrest.

McGuinness was a suspect in an investigation into the kidnap and torture of Northern Irish businessman Kevin Lunney.

The raid was part of a co-ordinated series of search operations, mainly focused on the Border area, linked to the brutal attack on Mr Lunney in September 2019.

On Thursday a spokesman for the police watchdog told Chesterfield Coroner's Court its investigation had found "there was not evidence to suggest that undue force had been used or there was anything in the actions of police that would have contributed to his death".

"Clearly the stress of the entry into the property in the early hours of the morning is for any individual going to be stressful, but whether it was causative or incidental is impossible to say," the spokesman added.

Coroner Peter Nieto said Mr McGuinness had been suffering from a serious heart disease.

He said one of the areas he wanted to explore was whether Mr McGuinness had a heart attack because of the search of his home.

He added he also planned to look into whether "reasonable measures were taken on the day in view of any known medical issues" and whether CPR was undertaken correctly.

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No date was set for the inquest but it was decided there should be a jury.

The raid on Mr McGuinness's home was part of a joint police operation across the UK and Ireland in which almost 20 properties were raided.

‘Dublin Jimmy’ was suspected of orchestrating the campaign of violence against directors of Quinn Industrial Holdings including Mr Lunney which began in 2015.

It previously emerged that the discovery of a number of bank accounts that were used by bogus front companies set up in the Republic on behalf of McGuinness may also lead directly to the mysterious ‘paymaster’ who paid McGuinness to orchestrate the campaign of violence.

Gardai have said that this campaign escalated from 2016 onwards to include criminal damage, assault causing harm, false imprisonment, blackmail and extortion before Mr Lunney was attacked.

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