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Enough is enough Irish hauliers threaten to block 'all ports and motorways' in major fuel price protest

'Instead of having small protests every now and then let's do it together and sort the problems'

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The group has called for support in protests aimed at blocking major motorways. (Pictured, the M50 motorway (stock photo)

The group has called for support in protests aimed at blocking major motorways. (Pictured, the M50 motorway (stock photo)

The group has called for support in protests aimed at blocking major motorways. (Pictured, the M50 motorway (stock photo)

A group representing Irish hauliers has threatened to block “all cities, ports and motorways” in a day of action earmarked for November 24. 

The Irish Truckers & Haulage Association Against Fuel Prices has said a planned protest over rising operating costs is happening, “no matter what” and that the Dail, Leinster House and Dublin Castle will also be blockaded.

In a Facebook post, the association said it is calling on “all hauliers, couriers, taxi drivers, bus drivers, farmers etc to join on and make our voice be heard”.

“Instead of having small protests every now and then let's do it together and sort the problems.. enough is enough,” they stated.

“On the 24th We want to block all Ports, motorways and Cities, The Dail, Leinster House, Dublin Castle etc.

“We need as many body's (sic) as possible and as many vehicles as possible. Just to clarify, there is a planned Protest happening on the 24th of November...no matters what no negotiations!

Haulage companies have already threatened protests over new Government targets for cutting carbon emissions.

A major report by the Climate Change Advisory Council that was published last week recommends that the Government implement three consecutive five-year carbon budgets in a bid to reach its goal of halving emissions by 2030.

If adopted by the Oireachtas, the plan will set out limits on emissions for specific sectors, including transport and agriculture.

Eugene Drennan, President of the Irish Road Haulage Association (IRHA), said hauliers will meet in the next fortnight to discuss whether they should protest the proposals.

“We are deeply concerned about the emissions cuts. We have been labelled as a sector that is going to get a heavy cut,” Drennan told RTÉ Radio One’s Morning Ireland programme last week.

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He said that costs were already “astronomically high” for companies in the sector due to a shortage of drivers, increases to the Carbon Tax announced as part of Budget 2022 and rising fuel costs in general.

“Nobody has seen the specific details in any sector — so that’s concern number one,” Drennan told The Journal following his radio appearance.

"But the main concern is we contributed €73 million in Carbon Tax last year. We’ll contribute over a €100 million next year. We’ve been paying carbon taxes now for about five years and fuel is already taxed to the hilt here.”

Mr Drennan added that rising costs in other areas are hammering the transport sector this year, while petrol and diesel prices have increased sharply, partly related to higher crude oil prices due to a recovery in global demand.

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