| 15.1°C Dublin

mortgage rates Irish borrowers pay €2.2k more a year for mortgage than eurozone average

This is because Ireland continues to have some of the most expensive new mortgage rates

Close

Mortgage rates in Ireland are the second highest in the Eurozone. Stock image

Mortgage rates in Ireland are the second highest in the Eurozone. Stock image

Mortgage rates in Ireland are the second highest in the Eurozone. Stock image

Borrowers in Ireland are paying thousands of euro more a year for a mortgage than the average in the eurozone.

This is because Ireland continues to have some of the most expensive new mortgage rates, despite greater competition from non-bank lenders Finance Ireland and Avant Money.

New mortgage rates here are the highest across the euro area after Greece, according to figures from the Central Bank.

It said the average new mortgage rate in this country in June was 2.74pc, down five basis points on the same month last year.

The average for the eurozone was 1.27pc, although the rate varied considerably across countries.

"Ireland had the second-highest mortgage interest rate across the euro area," the Central Bank said.

This means new borrowers are paying around €2,200 more a year than the average across the eurozone.

On a monthly basis, the difference works out at €184, according to Daragh Cassidy of price comparison site Bonkers.

Bankers say regulatory requirements on how much capital they must set aside when issuing mortgages and the difficulties in repossessing homes when no payments are being made are the reasons for the higher cost of borrowing.

However, a number of smaller lenders have cut their rates in recent weeks, although there has been no response from the main players, AIB, Bank of Ireland and Permanent TSB.

EBS recently announced cuts to some of its fixed rates and Haven introduced a low "green" rate of 2.15pc, while last week ICS Mortgages became only the second lender in Ireland to offer a rate below 2pc.

Mr Cassidy said: "This isn't yet feeding through into the average rate most households are paying."

Sunday World Newsletter

Sign up for the latest news and updates

This field is required This field is required

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices


Privacy