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Wally's return Ireland's favourite Arctic Walrus hangs out in West Cork motor boat

It has been reported that Wally may have been responsible for damaging a few boats in the area

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 A still taken from a video posted to social media by Clonakilty Distillery

 A still taken from a video posted to social media by Clonakilty Distillery

 A still taken from a video posted to social media by Clonakilty Distillery

Ireland's favourite Arctic Walrus, Wally, has been spotted taking a break from the water by hanging out in a motor boat in West Cork. 

The massive mammal was captured on video by one of the staff of Clonakilty Distillery, lounging around on one of their boats.

The boat is owned by a team member of the Distillery, who shared their own photo of Wally and captioned it "we reckon he must have stopped by on his travels for a refreshing Minke G&T."

With walruses often exceeding 2,000kgs in weight, it has been reported that Wally may have been responsible for damaging a few boats in the area already.

After being spotted at various coastal towns in England, Wales and Ireland, Wally reappeared in Dunnycove, Ardfield where Gerard Dillane took a picture of the walrus snoozing atop of a speedboat "having earlier sank one boat and damaged a number of others."

Rescue Ireland have launched an appeal for unused rigid inflatable boats (rib) for him and his potential pals to rest on.

"As a Pinniped (like seals and sea lions) walruses are semi-aquatic, which means they must come up on land (or a floating object) to rest," they said.

"This also means that they are more vulnerable to human disturbances."

They added that "this walrus has been known to climb onto ribs and boats to have a rest, which can cause damage to property and put his safety at risk."

The organisation are asking the public to avoid going within 100m of Wally and to avoid sharing his exact location until he's being monitored.

Speaking on RTÉ's Morning Ireland Pádraig Whooley from the Irish Dolphin and Whale Group confirmed that the animal spotted in Waterford was the same Arctic Walrus that has been on a 2,000 mile odyssey.

The marine wildlife expert said it had been a “remarkable” journey, with Wally going as far south as La Rochelle, France.

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He added that walruses may look slow and huge on land - but can travel very fast in the water.

"Although these images have a comic quality to them, there is a serious side to this, as this animal is a long way from home and we’ve no way of knowing whether it is stressed, and how it may react to stressful situations.

"So we’d ask everyone who wants to see this rare Arctic visitor to respect its space, as it’s important that we come out the other end of this episode without injury to people or animal - even if we can’t guarantee he won’t sink a few boats.”

The walrus started on a rare tour of the coasts of Ireland, Wales, and Cornwall after he was first spotted on Kerry's Valentia Island last March.

From there, Wally headed south for warmer waters and has been spotted around France, Spain and Wales before spending six weeks on the Cornish coast.

He was seen most recently at the Isles of Scilly before being spotted at Clonea Strand, Co Waterford, on Monday afternoon.

Wally is believed to have originated in Svalbard, north of Norway.

Some scientists believe he fell asleep on a floating sheet of ice and found himself very far from home.

While in the Scilly Isles, a purpose-built pontoon was made for the walrus in a bid to reduce damage he had been causing to a number of boats and in a bid to encourage him to leave.

He sank or damaged a number of vessels there since arriving in June.

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