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on the box Ian Bailey joins Instagram as new TV shows on Sophie Toscan du Plantier murder released

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Ian Bailey. Pic: Instagram

Ian Bailey. Pic: Instagram

Ian Bailey. Pic: Instagram

IAN Bailey has started promoting himself on Instagram as two new documentaries on the brutal murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier in west Cork are set to be released.

The 64-year-old Englishman was convicted in absentia of the killing by a Paris court in 2019 but has always vehemently protested his innocence.

Two separate documentaries on the murder of the 39-year-old Frenchwoman at her holiday home in Schull in 1996 are set to be released over the next two weeks.

Murder at the Cottage: The Search for Justice for Sophie , a five-part series by acclaimed director Jim Sheridan, is set to air on Sky Crime and streaming service NOW from tomorrow.

The family of Sophie Toscan du Plantier had been interviewed as part of the series but wrote to Sky to ask that their interviews be removed as they were understood to be unhappy with Bailey being portrayed as a victim in the documentary.

Sky agreed to their request to remove the interviews.

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Ian Bailey. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA

Ian Bailey. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA

Ian Bailey. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA

A separate three-part documentary on the killing is set to air on Netflix later this month. Sophie: A Murder in West Cork will be released on June 30 and features interviews with Sophie’s son Pierre-Louis Baudey as well as locals in Schull and journalists who covered the case.

Bailey has set up an Instagram page to promote himself in recent days ahead of the release of the documentaries.

In his first post he advertised is his stall in Schull Sunday Market and said he had “poetry, hand carved wooden bowls, platters and Indian yak hide bags”.

He posted a second picture on Friday from Bantry market where he was holding up a copy of his book of poetry ‘A John Wayne State of Mind’ which reflects on his experiences during 2019 when he said he was "was bonfired on a pyre of lies in Paris".

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Sophie Toscan Du Plantier (Picture: Provision)

Sophie Toscan Du Plantier (Picture: Provision)

Sophie Toscan Du Plantier (Picture: Provision)

As well as the documentaries there has been a recent podcast on the killing and several books.

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Sophie Toscan Du Plantier (Picture: Provision)

Sophie Toscan Du Plantier (Picture: Provision)

Sophie Toscan Du Plantier (Picture: Provision)

While Bailey used Instagram to promote his own book this weekend ahead of the release of the documentaries, Bailey believes some people who are writing books or involved in documentaries about the case are in it for the money.

“For some of them, it is all about the money – it is not about truth, it is not about justice, it is only about the money,” he told the Irish Independent.

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“It is as if some people are trying to feed off my carcass while I am still alive.”

He said he was happy with the Jim Sheridan documentary saying that projects was not about money but said he felt the rival Netflix series would “demonise” him.

“I believe it is more a piece of propaganda.”

“I have been fighting for justice for 24 years – people tend to forget that. I am an innocent person caught up in this nightmare. This has been a never ending nightmare for me.”

While he was convicted in his absence in Paris in 2019, the courts here have concluded that he should not be surrendered to France.

Bailey was arrested by gardai twice in relation to the murder but was released without charge on both occasions and has always denied any involvement.

He revealed last month that he has written to Garda Commissioner Drew Harris, Taoiseach Micheal Martin and the DPP to seek a fresh review of the case which he believes will confirm his innocence.

Sophie, who was a French television producer, was beaten to death outside her home in Schull on December 23, 1996.

Bailey, who lived in a cottage nearby covered the case as a journalist, but became a suspect as he had cuts on his hands and face and had left his cottage on the night of the killing.

The original investigation was heavily criticised and vital forensic evidence is believed to have been lost as the State Pathologist John Harbison did not arrive at the scene until 24 hours after the killing.

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