| 10.1°C Dublin

latest figures Holohan warns of 'concerning' levels of virus circulating as 1,296 new cases and six further deaths confirmed

Close

Chief medical officer Dr Tony Holohan confirmed the new variant of Covid-19 had been detected by the National Virus Reference Laboratory in Dublin

Chief medical officer Dr Tony Holohan confirmed the new variant of Covid-19 had been detected by the National Virus Reference Laboratory in Dublin

Chief medical officer Dr Tony Holohan confirmed the new variant of Covid-19 had been detected by the National Virus Reference Laboratory in Dublin

There has been 1,296 new cases of Covid-19 in Ireland, the Department of Health has confirmed.

There is now a total of 85,394 confirmed cases.

A further six further deaths linked to Covid-19 have been reported, bringing the death toll to 2,200.

Chief Medical Officer, Dr Tony Holohan, warned that there is now a "concerning" level of the virus circulating.

He said: “For the second day in a row we are reporting more than a thousand confirmed cases of Covid-19.

"Within a few short weeks of easing measures at the beginning of December, we have now returned to the very high levels of Covid-19 circulating in the community that we have not seen since the peak of Wave Two of this disease. This is very concerning.

Dr Holohan welcomed the delivery of the first batch of the Pfizer vaccine today, but urged the public to continue to conform with public health measures.

“While today is a positive day with the arrival of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 Vaccine (Comirnaty), it does not mean that we can relax our adherence to public health measures," he said.

“We must continue to stay at home, avoid social contact where possible, avoid visiting friends and family and not have visitors to our homes. Our adherence to public health advice will remain our best defence against this disease and help us protect our vulnerable loved ones from the effects of Covid-19.”

HSE chief executive Paul Reid this morning described the first delivery as a “momentous day” for the country.

He tweeted: “An early morning start to a momentous day. Heading off to take receipt of the first delivery of the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine for the HSE. There will be better days ahead for sure. For now, #StaySafe”

The vaccine is to be supplied to the most vulnerable in society first, such as nursing home residents.

However, Taoiseach Micheal Martin has warned it will be up to six months before things start to return to normal.

He said: “The first six months of 2021 we will see improvements, but we certainly not will see normality in the first six months.”

Mr Martin said the initial phase will make a “significant difference” and protect the most vulnerable.

He added: “Certainly manufacturing of the vaccine will be ramped up, certainly from March onwards.”

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices

Online Editors


Privacy