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17 businesses inspected Gardai raid properties as part of European-wide operation targeting labour exploitation 

The operation which was run over a two day period earlier this month in Dublin, Louth and Monaghan concentrated on massage parlours, nail bars and car washes

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Gardai continue to target dealers who have fled Drogheda. FILE PHOTO

Gardai continue to target dealers who have fled Drogheda. FILE PHOTO

Gardai continue to target dealers who have fled Drogheda. FILE PHOTO

Gardai have said that a total of 53 people were assessed for “indicators of human trafficking, labour and sexual exploitation” as part of a European-wide operation targeting labour exploitation. 

The operation which was run over a two day period earlier this month in Dublin, Louth and Monaghan concentrated on massage parlours, nail bars and car washes.

In total 17 businesses were inspected over the two day period of June 2 and 3.

A number of Immigration matters were dealt with but no arrests were made, they added.

“An Garda Síochána adopted a multi-agency approach with the Garda National Protective Services Bureau and Garda National Immigration Bureau working with outside agencies, including the Work Place Relations Commission, The Revenue Commissioners and the Dept. of Social Protection,” gardai revealed.

Between May 31 and June 6, Europol supported Europe-wide coordinated action days against human trafficking for labour exploitation.

The operation, led by the Netherlands, involved a wide range of law enforcement authorities including police, immigration and border guards, labour inspectorates and tax authorities. In total, 23 countries took part in the coordinated operational activities.

The action week resulted in 229 arrests (73 for trafficking of human beings); 630 possible victims of different types of exploitation identified; as well as 4,890 locations, 16,530+ vehicles and more than 56,250 people checked.

It also led to 750 new investigations being initiated, 150 related to trafficking of human beings.

“Law enforcement authorities carried out inspections in labour-intensive sectors, which require low-skilled workers,” Europol said. “Employees in sectors such as transport, logistics and construction are more vulnerable to exploitation due to the lower level of education and awareness required with regard to labour rights and human trafficking.

“The economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has also reinforced certain vulnerabilities. For example, victims accept employment in working conditions that may threaten their health. These endangering factors include overcrowded working environments, low hygiene arrangements and no health supervision.”

Europol provided analytical and operational support and facilitated the real-time exchange of communication between the participating authorities.

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