| 7.2°C Dublin

Covid latest Four stillbirths potentially related to Covid-19 - Dr Ronan Glynn

Speaking this evening, Dr Glynn said the reports should be "interpreted with caution" as the coroners have not yet concluded their findings.

Close

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Ronan Glynn (Tom Honan/PA)

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Ronan Glynn (Tom Honan/PA)

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Ronan Glynn (Tom Honan/PA)

There has been four preliminary reports of stillbirths potentially associated with a condition called Covid Placentitis, Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Ronan Glynn has said.

Placentitis is an inflammation of the placenta that can lead to stillbirth.

Speaking this evening, Dr Glynn said the reports should be "interpreted with caution" as the coSpeaking this evening, Dr Glynn said the reports should be "interpreted with caution" as the coroners have not yet concluded their findings.

roners have not yet concluded their findings.

"The HSEs National Women and Infants Programme is aware of and is monitoring the situation and has issued a related notice to obstetric departments. I would ask that the privacy of all of those affected by this disease continue to be respected at all times" he said.

While it is of concern, the Deputy CMO said the international data shows that it is a very rare condition.

Dr Glynn said that the advice to pregnant women has not changed at this time but advised any pregnant women that has concerns to talk to their doctor or “if they have any specific concerns, they should get in touch with their local obstetrics department.”

"It is important to note that these findings are preliminary but we felt there was a duty on us to report those findings. As soon as we have further information we will report it".

There has been 39 further deaths linked to Covid-19 and 462 new cases reported by the Department of Health this evening.

Ten of these deaths occurred in March, 12 occurred in February, 13 in January, and three occurred earlier than this. One further death is under investigation.

There has now been 4,396 deaths related to the virus, while there is now a total of 221,649 confirmed cases.

Of the cases notified today, 207 are in Dublin, 29 in Cork, 26 in Meath, 20 in Kildare, 18 in Galway and the remaining 162 cases are spread across all other counties.

As of March 1, 446,474 doses of Covid-19 vaccine have been administered in Ireland, with 303,550 people receiving their first dose and 142,924 receiving their second.

It comes as HSE chief Paul Reid said Ireland’s incidence of Covid-19 is continuing to improve, but “at a slower rate".

Paul Reid said positive signs of the impact of vaccinations for older people were beginning to emerge.

“Of the new cases notified over the past two weeks, 478 cases had the most likely transmission source of a healthcare setting,” he said.

“That is down from over 1,050 cases in the previous two weeks.

“During the same time-frame the overall number of cases reduced by 24pc, but the reduction in health care setting-acquired cases was more than double that at 52pc, so it would seem we are seeing some of the early benefits of vaccinations.”

Mr Reid said hospital admissions were reducing, not at the pace he would like, but a continued trend downwards was being recorded.

He said there were 460 people with Covid-19 being treated in hospital on Thursday, down 21pc on the same day last week, and down 78pc on the peak in January.

There were 108 people in ICU, down 22pc overall on the last week.

But Mr Reid said there were also 170 people receiving advanced respiratory support, many of whom would end up in ICU.

He said he was “truly grateful” for the continued support of the public the majority of whom were adhering to the public health restrictions.

But he said the actions of a smaller minority was causing “a lot of hurt and frustration for everybody, for the vast majority of the public who continue to do everything that we have been asking of them”.


Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices

Online Editors


Privacy