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'historic fabric' Dublin's largest owner of offices lodges plans for mural to be painted on protected structure

IPUT say the mural will 'discourage unlawful graffiti and to make a positive contribution to the streetscape and surrounding vicinity'

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A mural on Cork’s Caroline Street by artist, Shane O’Driscoll. The mural was part of a placemaking initiative with Brown Thomas and Cork City Council. Mr O’Driscoll is to be commissioned by IPUT to paint a mural on Dublin’s Pearse Street.

A mural on Cork’s Caroline Street by artist, Shane O’Driscoll. The mural was part of a placemaking initiative with Brown Thomas and Cork City Council. Mr O’Driscoll is to be commissioned by IPUT to paint a mural on Dublin’s Pearse Street.

A mural on Cork’s Caroline Street by artist, Shane O’Driscoll. The mural was part of a placemaking initiative with Brown Thomas and Cork City Council. Mr O’Driscoll is to be commissioned by IPUT to paint a mural on Dublin’s Pearse Street.

The largest owner of commercial offices in Dublin, IPUT plc has lodged plans for a mural to be painted on the sidewall of a protected structure on Dublin’s Pearse Street.

In the planning application, consultants for IPUT plc have told Dublin City Council that the planned mural at the side of 46 Pearse Street facing onto Magennis Place “is to discourage unlawful graffiti and to make a positive contribution to the streetscape and surrounding vicinity”.

A spokesman for IPUT plc said on Friday that “the proposed mural is part of IPUT's focus on cultural initiatives and placemaking across its portfolio”.

He said: “IPUT believes these investments create more attractive places and an enhanced experience for those who live and work in the neighbourhoods in which we are active.”

IPUT - which owns and manages a property portfolio of over €3 billion - has told Dublin City Council that it intends to commission artist Shane O’Driscoll for the mural at the Pearse Street building which was constructed around 1830.

Mr O’Driscoll has produced similar public art at Caroline Street in Cork which was part of a placemaking initiative with Brown Thomas and Cork City Council.

In a report lodged by Sheehan Planning with the IPUT plc application, Conor Sheehan has stated that the proposed mural will be completed using an appropriate breathable paint suitable to the historic fabric of the building and will be a completely reversible intervention.

Mr Sheehan said that “this ensures that the proposed works will have no impact on the historic fabric of the protected structures.”

Mr Sheehan has told the council that the planned mural “does not affect the appearance of the structure to render it inconsistent with the character of the structure.”

Among other initiatives, IPUT recently launched Living Canvas at Wilton Park and on Sir John Rogerson's Quay, to exhibit artwork in large scale outdoor installations in the city centre.

IPUT also pioneered the display of 'street art' in large scale on Sir John Rogerson's Quay in the capital with works by both Leah Hewson and James Earley.

A spokeswoman for Dublin City Council confirmed on Friday its Environment and Transportation department spent €206,308 on the removal of unauthorised around the city in 2020. The spend for 2021 is not available as yet.

A decision is due on the IPUT application later this month.

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