mistaken identity | 

Bad Sisters stars remind the world they are ‘definitely Irish’ after being dubbed ‘British’

The mistake isn’t the first time Irish stars have been called British – with the Bad Sisters debacle just the latest in a long-line of corrections.

Maeve McTaggartSunday World

Bad Sisters stars Eve Hewson and Eva Birthsitle have reeled at a recent New York Times articles that dubbed them “British actresses.”

The article was recommending their hit black comedy series as the best television of 2022, though the case of mistaken identity has fans (and the stars themselves) fuming.

“An appealing quintet of British actresses – Eva Birthistle, Anne-Marie Duff, Sarah Greene, Eve Hewson and Sharon Horgan – play the quarrelsome but devoted sisters of the title in this (very) darkly comic murder mystery,” the New York Times reported.

It has since been amended after the actresses made some very public call-outs.

“I’ll just speak for myself here but I’m definitely really an IRISH actor,” said Eva Birthistle.

Bono’s daughter Eve Hewson later followed with the tweet: “OH DEAR @nytimesarts. WE ARE IRISH, PLEASE AND THANK YOU.”

She added: “P.S. Anne-Marie is Irish/English but… still.”

Fans joined the Bad Sisters stars in hitting out at the article, with one joking: “This is when you know you’ve made it. When foreign press refer to you as British.”

The mistake isn’t the first time Irish stars have been called British – with the Bad Sisters debacle just the latest in a long-line of corrections.

Paul Mescal and Andrew Scott were dubbed British when they received Emmy Award nominations in 2020, with Maynooth man Paul taking to Twitter to issue the statement: “I’m Irish.”

Another famous iteration is Cork star Cillian Murphy’s frequent corrections on where he is from.

Ina now iconic interview clip, a mistaken reporter said “you are both British...” to Murphy and Inception co-star Tom Hardy.

"No, I’m Irish,” the Peaky Blinder star interrupted.

Digging a deeper hole, the interviewer replied: “Yeah I know, British.”

"No, no, no, I’m Irish,” a stern Murphy said.

Saoirse Ronan has often had to fight mistaken claims that she is British and from the UK.

A notorious moment during the Sky News coverage of the 2016 BAFTAs, reporter Richard Suchet made a move that caused uproar.

"I think we can take Saoirse Ronan as one of ours,” he said when discussing her Leading Actress nomination.

Suchet later suggested that he mean it as "a compliment.”


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