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Wally on tour Animal conservation group warns public not to disturb Wally the Walrus

"if you are going to go and watch it, watch it from the safety of the shore"

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Wally the walrus off the coast of Clonakilty. Photo: Clonakilty Distillery

Wally the walrus off the coast of Clonakilty. Photo: Clonakilty Distillery

Wally the walrus off the coast of Clonakilty. Photo: Clonakilty Distillery

An animal conservation group has warned people not to disturb Wally the Walrus as he continues his tour of Ireland.

The Arctic walrus was first spotted in Ireland back in March and has most recently been spotted off the coast of Cork after popping up along the Waterford coast earlier this month.

Today, he was spotted in Cork town of Crookhaven, with crowds of people turning up to catch a glimpse as he relaxed on a boat near the harbour.

While there are concerns about Wally, who has been embarking on an “extremely unusual” journey, the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group Sightings Officer, Padraig Whooley, says that the animal “seems to be doing just fine” but has urged the public to keep their distance.

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Wally the walrus off the coast of Clonakilty. Photo: Clonakilty Distillery

Wally the walrus off the coast of Clonakilty. Photo: Clonakilty Distillery

Wally the walrus off the coast of Clonakilty. Photo: Clonakilty Distillery

 

Speaking on Morning Ireland, he said: “It is moving. It's doing all the right things. It's taking 30-40km chunks of coastline and moving along and of course, everywhere that it turns up, it is, unfortunately, creating a bit of a circus.

“The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group and all the other organisations are at pains to ask people if you are going to go and watch it, watch it from the safety of the shore.

“Don't mill around it on boats because it has the potential to disturb this animal.

“It is doing fine. It looks hale and hearty... We're not seeing any evidence that it is injured.

“The less interference from both members of the public and indeed from organisations that feel compelled to somehow get in there and to help it along, it's doing absolutely fine on its own.

“There's no evidence that it'll benefit from human protection. We don't want it to become too comfortable so we want to urge it to move on so that it can finally start that track north.”

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