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'Can't type for tears' Andrew McGinley ‘overwhelmed’ by donations for charity set up in memory of his children

Little bit emotional. I’ve just gone through your As Darragh Did donations and I’m overwhelmed by your support,” he said.

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Andrew pictured with his three beloved children; Conor, Darragh and Carla

Andrew pictured with his three beloved children; Conor, Darragh and Carla

Andrew pictured with his three beloved children; Conor, Darragh and Carla

Andrew McGinley - the husband of Deirdre Morley - said he is “overwhelmed” by the donations he has received for the charity set up in memory of his late children.

The former nurse Ms Morley was found not guilty by way of insanity of the murder of her children Conor, Darragh and Carla McGinley.

Mr McGinley wrote today on Twitter about the support he’s received for his charity, As Darragh Did, which encourages people to get more involved locally.

“Little bit emotional. I’ve just gone through your As Darragh Did donations and I’m overwhelmed by your support,” he said.

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Andrew McGinley with his three children Conor, Darragh and Carla. Picture from @conorsclips on Twitter

Andrew McGinley with his three children Conor, Darragh and Carla. Picture from @conorsclips on Twitter

Andrew McGinley with his three children Conor, Darragh and Carla. Picture from @conorsclips on Twitter

“Hopefully I will have responded to you all this week to thank you individually. Can’t type for tears at the moment. Thank you.”

The charity was set up in memory of his son Darragh, who was involved in a number of local activities, such as Rathcoole Boys, St Marys GAA in Saggart and Commercials Hurling.

His other son Conor always wanted to have a YouTube channel. As such, Mr McGinley set up Conor’s Clips on YouTube to let his children’s memory live on.

His daughter Carla wanted a snowman, but as it doesn’t snow every year in Ireland, he organised a colouring competition in her name with Snowman for Carla.

Meanwhile, Mr McGinley said today that he has “no doubt” had he been included in Ms Morley's therapy as an advocate, his children would still be alive today.

“After Christmas 2019, and early in January 2020, the family and the support circle - and we had a huge support circle - we were all of the opinion that Dee was improving,” he said on Newstalk Breakfast this morning.

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Conor, Darragh and Carla McGinley

Conor, Darragh and Carla McGinley

Conor, Darragh and Carla McGinley

“She was even talking about going back to work. So we thought she was on an upward move, and that she was improving.

"Whilst it came out in court that the mental services that were treating her thought she was in decline.

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“And there’s also, within the trial, a decision that was left to Dee at that time, where they are saying that her health is deteriorating with the, I would say the knowledge, that her thought process and her decision making may have been impacted by her illness.”

He also said that while he believes families should be included in mental health proceedings, ultimately the patient would still have the final say.

“If you were painting your kitchen you would probably turn around to say to somebody else: ‘what do you think?’ You would seek advice,” Mr McGinley said.

“Now whether Deirdre would have taken my advice, it’s not to say. Ultimately the decision would have been up to her. But I would hope that the professional services that were treating her would know that what is best for the patient.

“I think in this case, at Christmas 2019, they put a question to Dee about being readmitted. So in their opinion, they thought that was the best thing to do. They recognised that her health is deteriorating, and yet we on the other side are thinking that she is improving. It’s hard to understand for people.”

He added that: “Quite simply, if the mental health services would have contacted me and said: ‘Listen, I’m just wondering after the consultation, what did Deidre say to you?’ And I could have said: ‘She said A, B, and C’. And they could have went, “Oh, well actually she should have said X, Y, and Z’.

“It’s including and asking questions, and gaining knowledge. That’s really what they should be doing.”

Mr McGinley said he’s doing “alright” following the trial of Ms Morley.

For now, his focus is on various projects which keep the memory of his children alive.

If you have been affected by any of the issues in this piece, please free phone the Samaritans at 116 123.

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