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Stay vigilant Alert issued after reports of Lion’s Mane jellyfish washing up on Dublin beaches

According to the HSE, the Lion’s Mane is “the most serious” jellyfish to be found around Ireland’s coastline

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Fingal County Council has warned beachgoers and sea swimmers after a number of Lion's Mane jellyfish were spotted on Donabate beach

Fingal County Council has warned beachgoers and sea swimmers after a number of Lion's Mane jellyfish were spotted on Donabate beach

Fingal County Council has warned beachgoers and sea swimmers after a number of Lion's Mane jellyfish were spotted on Donabate beach

Beachgoers and sea swimmers need to be extra vigilant this week due to the presence of significant numbers of Lion’s Mane jellyfish along the north Dublin coastline, a local authority has warned.

Fingal County Council has issued an alert after receiving reports of large numbers of the dreaded jellyfish species washed up on Donabate beach over the weekend.

It said Lion’s Mane jellyfish may also be spotted at its other beaches.

Weather conditions are generally ideal for this type of jellyfish up to the second week of September and the council said there will be a noticeable increase in their numbers on beaches and in the water.

Fingal County Council urged bathers to be extra vigilant on beaches where Lion’s Mane jellyfish are found. Even when they are dead and washed up on the shore, the venom stays in their tentacles for a few days.

“With so many long trailing tentacles, there is a chance you could still get stung, even when you try not to swim near them,” a spokesperson said.

“Also, fragments of the Lion’s Mane jellyfish’s tentacles that break off in the water will sting you, even if they’re no longer attached to the jellyfish.”

A sting from a Lion’s Mane jellyfish can cause nausea, sweating, cramps, headaches and other symptoms.

Those who suffer severe stings – anything more than just mild discomfort – are advised to seek urgent medical attention.

Fingal County Council said a red flag to advise against swimming may be raised on a lifeguarded beach where large numbers of Lion’s Mane jellyfish are present.

However, as the bathing season is coming to an end, lifeguards will only be on duty at Velvet Strand in Portmarnock this coming weekend.

If you are stung by a Lion’s Mane jellyfish, you are advised to remove any attached tentacles using a glove, stick or towel.

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You should rinse the affected area with seawater, but do not rub as this may result in further venom release. The use of an icepack is also recommended.

According to the HSE, the Lion’s Mane is “the most serious” jellyfish to be found around Ireland’s coastline.

It said jellyfish stings are not usually life-threatening and most just require basic first aid. In rare cases, however, they can result in serious allergic reactions.

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