| 15.1°C Dublin

treble joy Dublin mum who had nine rounds of IVF before having triplets says she never lost hope

Niamh and Jeff spent a gruelling seven years, and the guts of €50,000, chasing their dream of a family.

Close

Niamh and Jeff Quinlan with their daughters Molly, Megan and Chloe. Photos by Steve Humphreys

Niamh and Jeff Quinlan with their daughters Molly, Megan and Chloe. Photos by Steve Humphreys

Niamh and Jeff Quinlan with their daughters Molly, Megan and Chloe. Photos by Steve Humphreys

There are not too many mums whose own fathers are there to hear the pregnancy news before the daddy.

But Niamh Quinlan is not just any mum.

After nine rounds of IVF, the determined Dublin woman got the family she longed for all in one go, after her dad paid for the last round of fertility treatment.

She tells: "It worked in the very end. I am mam to triplets, which I conceived through Sims IVF; we have Molly, Megan and Chloe, who are 18 months old.

"My father, Michael, was there when they told me. It's so funny.

"He and his partner had paid for the last round because we had sort of given up on IVF and were going to go for surrogacy - but then we just went for it.

"I was in having a procedure after the IVF. I had a slight reaction to the drugs, and they had to put me under anaesthetic and they did a pregnancy blood test while I was under.

"My husband, Jeff, was doing exams, so my dad and my stepmum, Patricia, came with me.

"When I came around from the anaesthetic the nurse was there and my dad was there and they were smiling and informed me I was pregnant.

"After nine rounds that was the first positive pregnancy test.

"The moment was surreal. I was still a little bit out of it. I went back asleep and woke up again and was like, 'Was that real?'"

Niamh and Jeff live in south Dublin and spent a gruelling seven years, and the guts of €50,000, chasing their dream of a family, with all the financial and emotional stress that goes with it.

Niamh, who is a sales director at a healthcare company, says: "We were at about five weeks and they said it was twins.

Sunday World Newsletter

Sign up for the latest news and updates

This field is required This field is required

"They had seen two sacks and said it's twins, we'd put in two embryos.

"We were delighted and said, 'Look, that's our family done'. After so many years to have twins was just phenomenal.

"We then went back a couple of weeks later. It was July 5 - I will never forget it because I had a management meeting right afterwards, so I went in for the scan at 8am and the nurse was looking a bit concerned, so we were like, 'Is there something wrong?'

"Our instincts after so long were that there was something wrong and she goes, 'No, don't worry, it's multiples'. And then we said, 'Yeah, sure we knew that' and she said, 'No, there's a third heartbeat'.

"That was pretty amazing. She went away to get the consultant just to double check and she came back and confirmed we were having three babies.

"I was a little shocked and in a bit of awe, really. Jeff thanked God that he was sitting down when it happened. The babies' heartbeats were all there, that was the only thing that mattered to us once we were going to have healthy babies."

Niamh laughs when asked if she is a determined person - but admits that it was a long and heartbreaking journey.

She says: "I'd see friends and they'd be trying and then they'd become pregnant. So are you forever upset that someone is having a baby? You are delighted for them, but you're upset too for yourself. It's normal.

Close

Niamh and Jeff Quinlan with their 19-month-old triplets Molly, Chloe and Megan at their home in Ballycullen, Dublin.

Niamh and Jeff Quinlan with their 19-month-old triplets Molly, Chloe and Megan at their home in Ballycullen, Dublin.

Niamh and Jeff Quinlan with their 19-month-old triplets Molly, Chloe and Megan at their home in Ballycullen, Dublin.

"Jeff is a great person. He had always said he didn't mind it being just me, but he loves kids.

"I used to just keep picturing that family we were going to have, and I wasn't ready to give up on it yet. The girls are now walking and starting to talk, and they're saying 'mama' and 'dada'.

"We started this journey seven years ago. But we got there - we have three beautiful babies and we're just the luckiest people in the world."

The Ticking Clock is a six-part fertility series which celebrates the miracle of modern medicine with touching real-life stories, video content and expert advice online and in print each week. You can watch Niamh Quinlan tell her amazing story on sundayworld.com or sims.ie

Download the Sunday World app

Now download the free app for all the latest Sunday World News, Crime, Irish Showbiz and Sport. Available on Apple and Android devices


Privacy