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Dress for success What the frock do we wear when we go back to the office? 

Nearly two-thirds of those who worked remotely during the pandemic wore more casual clothing, to put it mildly, according to a recent poll.

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Get the frock out of here

Get the frock out of here

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Not Suitable For Work

Forget hybrid working - now it's hybrid dressing that's set to blazer a trail.

British designer Giles ­Deacon is just one of the ­couturiers to launch a line of post-pandemic workwear - and let's just say Don Draper won't be losing any sleep.

Slouchy suits and poofy frocks are just some of the comfy styles tipped to trend this autumn as home workers return to the office.

And we're definitely going to have to thought-shower a replacement for "suited and booted."

Nearly two-thirds of those who worked remotely during the pandemic wore more casual clothing, to put it mildly, according to a recent poll.

And 17% took 'business casual' to whole new extremes by wearing their pyjamas at work from home.

So good luck to HR executives tasked with asking employees to kindly put their pants back on as they go back to the workplace.

From No Tie Tuesdays to Tracksuit Thursdays and Dress-down Fridays, the concept of office wear was all getting a bit loosey-goosey long before lockdown.

Now the pandemic could finally put an end to fidgety button down shirts and back-zip pencil skirts for good, which is just as well, since none of us can remember how to fasten them anymore - if you're lucky enough to still fit into them.

Canadian recruit firm Lock Search Group is just one of those to ditch the dress code, inviting returning staff to use their judgement on what's appropriate to wear in the office.

Other firms have introduced 'blended dressing' so employees can wear casual duds like jeans and jumpers three days a week as they reacclimatise to their collars and cuffs.

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Get the frock out of here

Get the frock out of here

Get the frock out of here

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Naturally, the new vogue for athleisure meets workwear has already been given a name - 'workleisure' - with companies like Lululemon and Sweaty Betty, sold this week for $410m, set to coin it as we work all those leggings and yoga vests into our work wardrobe.

Stylists have also predicted an explosion of colour and print as we emerge from our pandemic ­chrysalises - and who doesn't want to hot desk next to a ­colleague channelling Mr Motivator when they could be curled up in their jammies with a laptop at home?

It's not the first time what we wear has forever been transformed by seismic social changes.

The French revolution, for example, made it a fashion faux pas for men to don snooty styles like breeches and buckled shoes, ushering in long pants and shoelaces instead.

However sadly, the pandemic is unlikely to make it acceptable to rock up to work in a Slanket and slipper boots.

But here's hoping that the bosses will allow the employees to continue to suit themselves. Until then, it's 'business on the top, quarantine on the bottom' all the way.

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