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Kiss me tiger First look review: Triumph Tiger Sport 660 has the style and the tech in a friendly package

Triple-powered middleweight claims class-leading power and spec – and is even A2 licence-friendly

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The Tiger Sport 660 produces 80bhp of power at 10,250rpm and 64Nm peak torque at 6,250rpm

The Tiger Sport 660 produces 80bhp of power at 10,250rpm and 64Nm peak torque at 6,250rpm

Triumph Tiger Sport 660

Triumph Tiger Sport 660

A Nissin braking system features alongside USD Showa forks and a rear monoshock that comes with an hydraulic remote adjuster

A Nissin braking system features alongside USD Showa forks and a rear monoshock that comes with an hydraulic remote adjuster

A short, underslung exhaust has been tuned to make the most of the triple note

A short, underslung exhaust has been tuned to make the most of the triple note

Triumph's Tiger Sport 660 - an immobiliser comes fitted as standard

Triumph's Tiger Sport 660 - an immobiliser comes fitted as standard

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The Tiger Sport 660 produces 80bhp of power at 10,250rpm and 64Nm peak torque at 6,250rpm

The girls and boys at Triumph have been keeping themselves busy throughout the ‘Great Unhappiness’ of the last 20 or so months.

This week they Introduced us to yet another new bike, the Tiger Sport 660, a machine they claim will give them a triple-powered advantage in the middleweight adventure sports class – with claimed class-leading levels of power and specification, and the lowest cost of ownership when compared to the other brands who are producing anything similar.

A lot of time has been spent on the motor. This one is putting out just shy of 80bhp at 10,250rpm. More interestingly, 64Nm peak torque is made at a more real-world figure of 6,250rpm, so the company seems to have done very well getting this sort of work out of a ‘block’ this size. The team have even managed to do all of this and made the bike  A2 licence-friendly.

A Nissin braking system fitted as standard, with a set of upside-down Showa forks and a rear monoshock from the same company that is fitted with a hydraulic remote adjuster. Adding to pillion comfort are a set of integrated grab bars. The new bike is shod, as standard, on a set of those excellent Michelin Road 5 tyres.

Mass centralisation is aided by a short, underslung exhaust that has been tuned to let that triple note sing without being intrusive. The bike is made for covering distance and details such as pannier mounts, a decent 17-litre tank and a one-hand adjustable screen are just the start of the story. Then we get to the technology.

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A Nissin braking system features alongside USD Showa forks and a rear monoshock that comes with an hydraulic remote adjuster

A Nissin braking system features alongside USD Showa forks and a rear monoshock that comes with an hydraulic remote adjuster

A Nissin braking system features alongside USD Showa forks and a rear monoshock that comes with an hydraulic remote adjuster

Security is dealt with thanks to an immobiliser that is fitted as standard. Comfort comes, in no small part, through the TFT display which has been made somewhat future-proof thanks to being ready to accept the connectivity system which mirrors your phone allowing you to navigate, take calls and listen to that Oasis album that you just seem not to be able to move on from.

Drive modes are Road and Rain, all the lights are LED affairs, and it even has self-cancelling indicators. ABS is standard, as it is on everything with this size of engine. The Sport also has switchable traction control, a ride-by-wire throttle and a slip and assist clutch. For something in this class, the specification really is top class.

 

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Triumph's Tiger Sport 660 - an immobiliser comes fitted as standard

Triumph's Tiger Sport 660 - an immobiliser comes fitted as standard

Triumph's Tiger Sport 660 - an immobiliser comes fitted as standard

The bike, as well as the staggering number of accessories available, comes with a full two-year warranty. It also has much longer service intervals of 16,000 kilometres. The rider’s behind will perch on the seat at a height of 835mm, but it has been tapered to offer foot on-the-floor security when parking up.

We’d expect it to be in Dublin Triumph next February. Unfortunately, prices weren’t available as we went to press. Give Declan at Triumph Dublin a call on 01-4642211 for more on this and the rest of the range.

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