'Irresponsible' | 

PrettyLittleThing ad banned for portraying Travis Barker’s teen daughter in a ‘sexual way’

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) ruled that the fast fashion retailer used “socially irresponsible” images of Alabama Barker, Travis Barker’s 16-year-old daughter, to promote their products.

Alabama Barker. Photo: Instagram

Neasa CumiskeySunday World

Fashion giant PrettyLittleThing has come under fire for publishing an advert portraying a child in a “sexual way”.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) ruled that the fast fashion retailer used “socially irresponsible” images of Alabama Barker, Travis Barker’s 16-year-old daughter, to promote their products.

The watchdog said that PrettyLittleThing drew attention to Alabama’s young age while featuring her in a series of sexually suggestive poses and clothing as she modelled for her Y2K Edit clothing collection.

As part of the campaign, Alabama wore an all-pink outfit which consisted of a pink mini dress, a pink jacket, pink high heels, and orange sunglasses as she sprayed a nearby hedge with a hose.

The overlaying text of the advert read: “Channel that teen dream realness with barely-there micro mini skirts.”

The ASA said the image “revealed her breasts” while another photo from the campaign saw her wearing a “tight-fitting short dress whilst sucking a lollipop”.

The ASA banned the advert as it was “in breach of our rules which state that ads must not portray or represent anyone who is, or seems to be, under 18 in a sexual way”, adding that the advert was “socially irresponsible” and “likely to cause harm and offence”.

PrettyLittleThing confirmed that Barker was underage at the time of the shoot and said they had chosen her as a brand ambassador because their customer base was primarily aged between 16 and 24 years old.

The retailer added that they “did not intend” to sexualise Barker and disagreed that she was portrayed in a sexual manner.

PrettyLittleThing maintained that the photos used in the campaign were approved by Barker and her team, saying that Barker sucking a lollipop and using a hose “fitted the intended Y2K aesthetic”.

The brand added they wanted to convey a message of body positivity to “encourage and empower young women to embrace their bodies and inspire confidence”.


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