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Role play Dear Angela: My BDSM lady wants me to be a 'house slave' but I have doubts

Sort your sexual problems with honest and practical tips from Dr Angela Brokmann

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It’s important to discuss the ground rules in a BDSM relationship

It’s important to discuss the ground rules in a BDSM relationship

It’s important to discuss the ground rules in a BDSM relationship

Sort your sexual problems with honest and practical tips from Dr Angela Brokmann

Dear Angela: At my first ever fetish party I (29) met this BDSM lady. She told me she’s been on the scene since she was 17 and that it’s her lifestyle. We got on great and went out a few times.

On our last date I tried to kiss her but she said I can’t do that. She explained that she is a dominant and that I have to play a submissive role if I want any kind of relationship with her. I’m OK with that — submitting to a dominant woman is a huge turn on for me.

But when she went on to explain that she’d like me to be her house slave I started to have doubts about the whole thing. I’m a newcomer to BDSM and only know the very basics so far. What does she mean by house slave? Does she want me to do her cleaning and cooking?

Answer: Basically, a house slave looks after a dominant partner. Their duties can include anything from cooking and cleaning to sexual acts. If the dominant partner is not satisfied with the house slave’s performance, they might dish out punishment.

It depends on what the dominant and submissive partner have agreed.

Some house slaves and dominants only meet for sessions, while others live together. Talk to your dominant lady to see what exactly she has in mind.

Email your problems to
Dr Angela Brokmann dr.angela@sundayworld.com
Maura O’Neill maura.oneill@sundayworld.com
All pictures are posed by models

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